Tag Archives: photos

Cool Quick Prototyping photos

A couple of good quick prototyping photos I located:

Prototyping
fast prototyping
Image by eekim
Day 15 of 2015. This year, I’m genuinely focused on packaging my work into public domain DIY kits that any person can use to assist groups turn out to be larger functionality. These days, my colearning pals — Pete Forsyth, Kate Wing, and Amy Wu — tested a new prototype of our DIY Strategy / Culture kit.

Int’l / Swift MashUp
fast prototyping
Image by R.Rasmussen
.. quickly-prototyping ..

Quickly Antiforensics
fast prototyping
Image by Travis Goodspeed
This disk has detected that it is getting imaged and is sending fake sectors to DD at two.3 MB/s. Ain’t that neighborly?

See my 29C3 talk for specifics on prototyping this with a Facedancer, and my upcoming 44Con speak for details of this faster, standalone version.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

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Nice Prototype Solutions photos

A handful of good prototype solutions photos I located:

Bochum – Eisenbahnmuseum Dahlhausen 66 002 DB-Baureihe 66 01
prototype services
Image by Daniel Mennerich
The DB Class 66 was a class of two Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB) locomotives created for fast goods train and passenger train services on the major and branch lines of Deutsche Bundesbahn (DB), the national railway of the former West Germany.

The Class 66 had been one of several newly created locomotive classes, the so-named Neubauloks, constructed for the DB soon after the Second Planet War. The 66s had a prime speed of 100 km/h and an axle load of only 15 tonnes which made them ideally suited to such duties. They had been intended to replace the former state railway (Länderbahn) locomotives of DRG classes 38.ten (ex-Prussian P 8), 78 (ex-Prussian T 18) and 93 (ex-Prussian T 14). Nonetheless rising competitors from diesel locomotives meant that no far more engines had been built soon after the two prototype, even even though they completely met all expectations and were a quite productive style. The Class 66 was the penultimate locomotive class to be constructed as portion of the DB’s Neubaulok construction programme.

Sinsheim – Technikmuseum Sinsheim – Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde 101-102 Air France F-BVFB 01
prototype services
Image by Daniel Mennerich
Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde is a retired turbojet-powered supersonic passenger airliner or supersonic transport (SST). It is one particular of only two SSTs to have entered industrial service the other was the Tupolev Tu-144. Concorde was jointly created and developed by Aérospatiale and the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC) beneath an Anglo-French treaty. First flown in 1969, Concorde entered service in 1976 and continued commercial flights for 27 years.

Among other destinations, Concorde flew standard transatlantic flights from London Heathrow and Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport to New York JFK, Washington Dulles and Barbados it flew these routes in significantly less than half the time of other airliners. With only 20 aircraft built, the development of Concorde was a substantial economic loss Air France and British Airways also received considerable government subsidies to obtain them. Concorde was retired in 2003 due to a basic downturn in the aviation industry soon after the type’s only crash in 2000, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, and a choice by Airbus, the successor firm of Aérospatiale and BAC, to discontinue maintenance help.

A total of 20 aircraft were built in France and the United Kingdom six of these had been prototypes and development aircraft. Seven every single were delivered to Air France and British Airways. Concorde’s name reflects the improvement agreement between the United Kingdom and France. In the UK, any or all of the type—unusually for an aircraft—are identified basically as &quotConcorde&quot, with no an report. The aircraft is regarded by many people as an aviation icon and an engineering marvel.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Nice Cnc Metal Prototype photos

A few good cnc metal prototype images I found:

Floor Panel Prototype
cnc metal prototype
Image by Caliper Studio
Caliper Studio created a stainless steel cast glass lens floor method for the lobby of the Metropol in Williamsburg Brooklyn. Its design and style borrows tips and strategies from the front facade of the Cassandra cinema also made by Caliper Studio. Each cast glass lens is sandwiched amongst steel bottom and stainless steel prime bent panels. The steel bars supply additional spanning capability, even though the wood strips connect prime and bottom panels to ensure that they act as a single unit.

Caliper Studio, 2009

ExoMars PanCam
cnc metal prototype
Image by UCL Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Prototype for the ExoMars Pan Cam: this image shows the optical bench, the primary metal structure that will hold all the optical elements, getting machined in a CNC lathe
.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Nice Rapid Tooling Manufacturing Service Manufacturers photos

A few nice fast tooling manufacturing service manufacturers images I discovered:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: SR-71 Blackbird (nose view)
rapid tooling manufacturing service manufacturers
Image by Chris Devers
See much more pictures of this, and the Wikipedia write-up.

Particulars, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in much more hostile airspace or with such full impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s efficiency and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments in the course of the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time for the duration of 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its final flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging three,418 kilometers (two,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane more than to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. &quotKelly&quot Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
All round: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Components:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-sort material) to lessen radar cross-section Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines function big inlet shock cones.

Lengthy Description:
No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated in more hostile airspace or with such comprehensive impunity than the SR-71 Blackbird. It is the fastest aircraft propelled by air-breathing engines. The Blackbird’s efficiency and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technologies developments in the course of the Cold War. The airplane was conceived when tensions with communist Eastern Europe reached levels approaching a complete-blown crisis in the mid-1950s. U.S. military commanders desperately required accurate assessments of Soviet worldwide military deployments, especially near the Iron Curtain. Lockheed Aircraft Corporation’s subsonic U-two (see NASM collection) reconnaissance aircraft was an in a position platform but the U. S. Air Force recognized that this reasonably slow aircraft was currently vulnerable to Soviet interceptors. They also understood that the speedy improvement of surface-to-air missile systems could place U-two pilots at grave danger. The danger proved reality when a U-2 was shot down by a surface to air missile more than the Soviet Union in 1960.

Lockheed’s initial proposal for a new high speed, higher altitude, reconnaissance aircraft, to be capable of avoiding interceptors and missiles, centered on a style propelled by liquid hydrogen. This proved to be impracticable since of considerable fuel consumption. Lockheed then reconfigured the design and style for standard fuels. This was feasible and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), already flying the Lockheed U-2, issued a production contract for an aircraft designated the A-12. Lockheed’s clandestine ‘Skunk Works’ division (headed by the gifted design and style engineer Clarence L. &quotKelly&quot Johnson) made the A-12 to cruise at Mach 3.2 and fly nicely above 18,288 m (60,000 feet). To meet these challenging needs, Lockheed engineers overcame numerous daunting technical challenges. Flying far more than 3 occasions the speed of sound generates 316° C (600° F) temperatures on external aircraft surfaces, which are sufficient to melt standard aluminum airframes. The design team chose to make the jet’s external skin of titanium alloy to which shielded the internal aluminum airframe. Two standard, but very powerful, afterburning turbine engines propelled this remarkable aircraft. These power plants had to operate across a enormous speed envelope in flight, from a takeoff speed of 334 kph (207 mph) to more than three,540 kph (two,200 mph). To prevent supersonic shock waves from moving inside the engine intake causing flameouts, Johnson’s team had to style a complex air intake and bypass method for the engines.

Skunk Works engineers also optimized the A-12 cross-section design to exhibit a low radar profile. Lockheed hoped to obtain this by meticulously shaping the airframe to reflect as tiny transmitted radar power (radio waves) as achievable, and by application of particular paint developed to absorb, rather than reflect, those waves. This therapy became a single of the 1st applications of stealth technology, but it in no way fully met the design and style targets.

Test pilot Lou Schalk flew the single-seat A-12 on April 24, 1962, after he became airborne accidentally during higher-speed taxi trials. The airplane showed fantastic guarantee but it required considerable technical refinement ahead of the CIA could fly the initial operational sortie on May possibly 31, 1967 – a surveillance flight over North Vietnam. A-12s, flown by CIA pilots, operated as element of the Air Force’s 1129th Particular Activities Squadron below the &quotOxcart&quot program. While Lockheed continued to refine the A-12, the U. S. Air Force ordered an interceptor version of the aircraft designated the YF-12A. The Skunk Performs, nonetheless, proposed a &quotspecific mission&quot version configured to conduct post-nuclear strike reconnaissance. This method evolved into the USAF’s familiar SR-71.

Lockheed built fifteen A-12s, such as a special two-seat trainer version. Two A-12s were modified to carry a specific reconnaissance drone, designated D-21. The modified A-12s had been redesignated M-21s. These have been made to take off with the D-21 drone, powered by a Marquart ramjet engine mounted on a pylon among the rudders. The M-21 then hauled the drone aloft and launched it at speeds higher enough to ignite the drone’s ramjet motor. Lockheed also constructed three YF-12As but this sort never went into production. Two of the YF-12As crashed during testing. Only one survives and is on display at the USAF Museum in Dayton, Ohio. The aft section of one of the &quotwritten off&quot YF-12As which was later utilised along with an SR-71A static test airframe to manufacture the sole SR-71C trainer. 1 SR-71 was lent to NASA and designated YF-12C. Such as the SR-71C and two SR-71B pilot trainers, Lockheed constructed thirty-two Blackbirds. The initial SR-71 flew on December 22, 1964. Since of extreme operational fees, military strategists decided that the more capable USAF SR-71s need to replace the CIA’s A-12s. These have been retired in 1968 following only one particular year of operational missions, mostly over southeast Asia. The Air Force’s 1st Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (element of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing) took more than the missions, flying the SR-71 starting in the spring of 1968.

Following the Air Force began to operate the SR-71, it acquired the official name Blackbird– for the special black paint that covered the airplane. This paint was formulated to absorb radar signals, to radiate some of the tremendous airframe heat generated by air friction, and to camouflage the aircraft against the dark sky at higher altitudes.

Experience gained from the A-12 program convinced the Air Force that flying the SR-71 safely essential two crew members, a pilot and a Reconnaissance Systems Officer (RSO). The RSO operated with the wide array of monitoring and defensive systems installed on the airplane. This equipment included a sophisticated Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) system that could jam most acquisition and targeting radar. In addition to an array of sophisticated, high-resolution cameras, the aircraft could also carry equipment developed to record the strength, frequency, and wavelength of signals emitted by communications and sensor devices such as radar. The SR-71 was created to fly deep into hostile territory, avoiding interception with its tremendous speed and higher altitude. It could operate safely at a maximum speed of Mach three.3 at an altitude much more than sixteen miles, or 25,908 m (85,000 ft), above the earth. The crew had to wear stress suits related to these worn by astronauts. These suits were needed to safeguard the crew in the event of sudden cabin stress loss whilst at operating altitudes.

To climb and cruise at supersonic speeds, the Blackbird’s Pratt &amp Whitney J-58 engines have been designed to operate constantly in afterburner. Even though this would appear to dictate higher fuel flows, the Blackbird actually achieved its best &quotgas mileage,&quot in terms of air nautical miles per pound of fuel burned, during the Mach 3+ cruise. A standard Blackbird reconnaissance flight may possibly demand numerous aerial refueling operations from an airborne tanker. Each time the SR-71 refueled, the crew had to descend to the tanker’s altitude, generally about 6,000 m to 9,000 m (20,000 to 30,000 ft), and slow the airplane to subsonic speeds. As velocity decreased, so did frictional heat. This cooling effect brought on the aircraft’s skin panels to shrink considerably, and these covering the fuel tanks contracted so a lot that fuel leaked, forming a distinctive vapor trail as the tanker topped off the Blackbird. As quickly as the tanks were filled, the jet’s crew disconnected from the tanker, relit the afterburners, and once again climbed to higher altitude.

Air Force pilots flew the SR-71 from Kadena AB, Japan, throughout its operational career but other bases hosted Blackbird operations, too. The 9th SRW sometimes deployed from Beale AFB, California, to other areas to carryout operational missions. Cuban missions have been flown straight from Beale. The SR-71 did not commence to operate in Europe until 1974, and then only temporarily. In 1982, when the U.S. Air Force primarily based two aircraft at Royal Air Force Base Mildenhall to fly monitoring mission in Eastern Europe.

When the SR-71 became operational, orbiting reconnaissance satellites had already replaced manned aircraft to gather intelligence from sites deep inside Soviet territory. Satellites could not cover every single geopolitical hotspot so the Blackbird remained a crucial tool for global intelligence gathering. On numerous occasions, pilots and RSOs flying the SR-71 offered information that proved important in formulating productive U. S. foreign policy. Blackbird crews supplied essential intelligence about the 1973 Yom Kippur War, the Israeli invasion of Lebanon and its aftermath, and pre- and post-strike imagery of the 1986 raid carried out by American air forces on Libya. In 1987, Kadena-primarily based SR-71 crews flew a quantity of missions over the Persian Gulf, revealing Iranian Silkworm missile batteries that threatened commercial shipping and American escort vessels.

As the efficiency of space-based surveillance systems grew, along with the effectiveness of ground-primarily based air defense networks, the Air Force started to lose enthusiasm for the high-priced system and the 9th SRW ceased SR-71 operations in January 1990. Regardless of protests by military leaders, Congress revived the program in 1995. Continued wrangling more than operating budgets, however, soon led to final termination. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration retained two SR-71As and the one SR-71B for higher-speed research projects and flew these airplanes till 1999.

On March 6, 1990, the service career of one Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird ended with a record-setting flight. This specific airplane bore Air Force serial quantity 64-17972. Lt. Col. Ed Yeilding and his RSO, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Vida, flew this aircraft from Los Angeles to Washington D.C. in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging a speed of three,418 kph (2,124 mph). At the conclusion of the flight, ‘972 landed at Dulles International Airport and taxied into the custody of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. At that time, Lt. Col. Vida had logged 1,392.7 hours of flight time in Blackbirds, far more than that of any other crewman.

This distinct SR-71 was also flown by Tom Alison, a former National Air and Space Museum’s Chief of Collections Management. Flying with Detachment 1 at Kadena Air Force Base, Okinawa, Alison logged far more than a dozen ‘972 operational sorties. The aircraft spent twenty-four years in active Air Force service and accrued a total of two,801.1 hours of flight time.

Wingspan: 55’7&quot
Length: 107’5&quot
Height: 18’6&quot
Weight: 170,000 Lbs

Reference and Further Reading:

Crickmore, Paul F. Lockheed SR-71: The Secret Missions Exposed. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1996.

Francillon, Rene J. Lockheed Aircraft Considering that 1913. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1987.

Johnson, Clarence L. Kelly: Much more Than My Share of It All. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1985.

Miller, Jay. Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Operates. Leicester, U.K.: Midland Counties Publishing Ltd., 1995.

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird curatorial file, Aeronautics Division, National Air and Space Museum.

DAD, 11-11-01

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Cool China Fixture Part Machining Makers photos

A few nice china fixture part machining manufacturers images I found:

WI – WR – Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
china fixture part machining manufacturers
Image by brizzle born and bred
Mathews’ Bristol Street Directory 1871

Wilder Street, North Street to Grosvenor Road

John Smith, lath render
J. T. Ball and Sons, maltsters, etc
John Summerville, builder, etc
Charles Pitman
James Merry, black smith
John Tucker
Thomas Davis, chimney sweep

William Sherring, nail manufacturer William Nichols – In October 1884 he was 14 years old, living with his parents in Baptist Mills and working at Messrs W Sherring of Wilder Street, a nail manufactory. Whilst carrying iron from the bins he slipped and fell against the flywheel. By the time the machine was stopped, he was dead. There was a fence around the machine, but the workers were in the habit of ‘pushing it aside’.

Withy & Co. ginger-beer, lemonade & soda-water manufacturers
James Williams, 1, Cave street cottages
Eliza Snow, fly proprietor, 2, Cave street cottages
Joseph Johnson, carpenter & undertaker, 3, Cave street cottages
George Smith, boot maker
William Lambert, grocer, etc
Joseph Chard, baker & flour dealer
J. Andrews, chimney sweeper
Ann Winniatt, shopkeeper
Joshua Williams, builder
George Mico, grocer
Mary Weston, greengrocer
James Seamer, beer seller

Mrs William Paul, vict, Two Trees 1794. John Lewis / 1806. Isaac Phipps / 1816. Stephen Seager / 1820 – 22. J. Morrosson / 1823 – 32. Samuel Morrosson 1834 – 45. James Vickery / 1847 – 61. James Bale / 1863. Edwin Hamber / 1865 – 69. George Lambourne / 1871. Mrs. Paul 1872 – 75. George Wintle (jnr) / 1877 – 78. Sarah Sowden / 1879 to 1882. John Sharp / 1883. C. Tomkins.

George Howard, vict, Albion Tavern 1841 – 53. Elizabeth Morrison / 1858 – 66. Henry Couzens / 1867 to 1868. W. Watts / 1869. Francis Virtue / 1871. George Howard 1872 to 1875. S. Barton / 1876. T. C. Manning / 1877. S. Balderson / 1878. C. Wyman / 1879. Samuel Harris / 1882 – 83. William Tarr 1885 – 88. William Bailey / 1889. George Clohesey / 1891. Sarah Ann Knight / 1892. Rosina Pollard / 1896 – 99. Charles Spiller 1901. Edward Coles.

Charles King, vict, Royal Oak 1832 – 34. Henry Watkins / 1869. George King / 1871. Charles King / 1872 to 1874. Mabel King / 1875 – 83. Isabella King 1885. George Knott / 1886 – 1909. Frederick King / 1914 – 17. Ellen White / 1921 – 25. Angelina Reed.

James Newman, vict, Crown 1860. John Yeandel / 1866 – 82. James Newman / 1883 to 1887. Kate Morgan / 1888 to 1891. Kate Rowles / 1892. Thomas Dinan 1896 – 1901. George Jenkins.

James Nash, vict, Royal George 1860. Ann Mundy / 1863 – 72. James Naish / 1874 – 81. Joseph W. Keall / 1882 – 87. William Clements / 1889 – 1901. James Thatcher.

Notes

Harry Dimmock – Living at Wilder Street, he was buried at St Paul on January 19th 1839 aged 71.

Ann Roach – Aged 21 in November 1842, she was taken to the Infirmary as while she was crossing Wilder Street she was knocked down by a fly (cab) which passed over her leg and injured it severely.

Wildgoose Cottages, St Philip’s Marsh

Wilkin’s Cottages, Folly Lane

William Street, Grosvenor road to Ashley Road

1. Maria Fuller
2. William Barter
3. Samuel David White
4. Henry Critchett
5. George Hill
6. James Wilmot
7. Herbert Cousins
8. George Browning
9. Charles Williams
10. Henry Hobbert
11. John Edward Sollis
12. Henry Tom Moody
13. David Bank Edwards
14. William Henry Thomas
15. John Goodeve, tea dealer

Notes

G Drake – Lived at 31, King Square. On 2nd March 1899 wrote to the newspaper stating that John Drake carpenter convicted of theft at the assizes was no connection. He did have a son called John who was also a carpenter who resided at 25, William Street, St Pauls.

William Street, Dings

Samuel Isles, beer retailer (Off Licence)
Francis Evans, grocer

William Street, Pylle Hill, Totterdown

2. Edwin Nott, haulier
3. George and Henry Roe
74. Henry Haskins, baker, Victoria house

1. Gilbert Babbage, vict, King William Hotel 1868 – 69. Aaron Davy / 1871 – 83. Gilbert Babbage / 1885 – 88. Matilda Morse / 1889 – 91. Henrietta Thomas 1892 to 1896. John Southwood / 1897. Joseph Gair / 1899. H. Smith / 1904. Emily Newman / 1909. Joseph Gullock 1912 – 21. Florence Annie Geh / 1925 – 38. Frederick Grove.

Williams’ Court, off Barton Street

Richard Excell – Aged 46 in 1818, a shoemaker living with his wife in Williams’ Court, Barton Street, they, were receiving relief payments from St Peter’s Hospital.

Willway Street, Philip Street, Bedminster

Robert Lewis, grocer
William Morgan, mason

George Parker, vict, Willway Tavern 1871. George Parker / 1872 to 1886. Herman Tozer / 1887 – 89. Elizabeth Tozer / 1891 – 1906. Alfred Tozer 1909. William Saunders / 1914 – 21. Leonard Wyatt / 1925 – 31. Robert Wyatt.

Samuel Hardwick, vict, Eagle Tavern 1871 – 77. Samuel Hardwick / 1878. Eli Bowditch / 1881 – 82. William Fewings / 1883 – 91. William Hill / 1892. Joseph Wring 1896. Mary Jane Wring / 1899. Henry Nichols / 1901. William Bryant / 1904. M. Broomsgrove.

Jesse Bumbold, vict, Chequers Tavern Whitehouse Lane / Willway Street. 1865 – 87. Jesse Rumbold / 1888 – 99. Benjamin Rowse / 1901. Henry Pillinger / 1904 – 06. Mary Hampton / 1909. Henry Hampton 1914. William Bailey / 1917 – 21. Albert Evans / 1925 – 28. Nellie Catherine Foxwell / 1931. Gabriel Biggin 1934 – 38. William James Rowland.

Willway Street, Whipping Cat Hill to Lucky Lane

15. Thomas Chinnock, dairyman
Wethered, Cossham, and Wethered, coal merchants, Railway yard

16. J. Gazzard, grocer and beer retailer, vict, Beaufort Arms grocery, bakery and beer house. 1870 – 76. Joseph Gazzard / 1881 – 86. William Bowyer / 1888. H. Maynard / 1888 – 89. John H. Kennard / 1891. Charlotte Baker 1892. George Dunn / 1899. Elizabeth Gulley / 1901 – 06. Hannah Underdown / 1914. Harry Stubbins.

Wilmot’s Crescent, Rose Street, Great Gardens

Wilmot’s Vale, Pipe Lane, Temple

Wilson Avenue, Wilson Street to Cross Gardens

(Beaufort Cottages)

Mark Appleby
Charles W. Porter
John Woodward, carpenter and builder
Elizabeth Thomas

(Beaufort Place)

John Purnell
George Dowling, smith
Charles Cockle
James Bailey
Thomas Wright
Edwin Mutton, boot maker

Wilson Court, Wilson Street

Wilson Place, Wilson Street

John Gore, 1, Wilson villas
William Mortimer, 2, Wilson villas
John Edwards, Aldine cottage
M. Bendell, Gloster cottage
John Cockle
Joseph Baker
John Kirby
M. Fowler
William Thompson
John Southern
John Cudler, mason
Joseph Davis, painter

Wilson Street, Portland Square to Cross Gardens

1. Charles D. Hall, relieving ofiicer
2. George Higgs Masters
3. William Wills, (post office)
4. Mrs Parry
5. Angus Cameron, draper
6. Henry Jones, carpenter
7. Miss Louisa Roberts
8. James Perry, boot maker
9. Joseph Griffin
10. William Ackland
11. William Smith
12. Charles Allen
13. David Griffin
14. Amos Deacon
15. Edward Taplin
16. Thomas Jones
(Gideon Cottages Intersect)
13. James Burrell
14. George Winterson, mason
15. Charles Cuthbert
16. Daniel Chapple
17. James Larcombe, grocer & beer seller
18. Mrs Cox
19. John Routley, grocer & beer seller
(cross over)

St. Paul’s National School, Henry George Clevely, master, Miss Wood, mistress – see below

19. John Clark
20. Mary Smith
21. John Marsh, wood carver
22. Samuel Pullin
23. David Williams
24. John Wakley, mason
25. Thomas Wall
26. Jane Ash
27. Elizabeth Holder
28. James Kingcott, tailor and draper
29. Frank Webb
30. George Adlam, junr.
31. Charles Phillips
Robert Nicholls
32. John Evans
33. Priscilla Mainwaring
31. Malcombe Robertson, tailor, etc
35. Sidney Sprod
36. John Postance
37. R. S. Deacon
38. Nathaniel Davis

Wright and Butler, lamp manufacturers of Birmingham. 1875 exhibited petroleum heating stoves at the 1875 Smithfield Club Show. Oil lamps with the American-style circular ‘The Union Burner’. By 1913 they had been taken over by Falk Veritas of London but use of the Trade name continued.

Parochial Schools, Wilson Street, St Pauls In 1883 225 boys, 162 girls. In 1898 185 boys, 162 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: George Vernon (Teacher), Miss F Perry (Teacher) 1861 Mr Clevely (Teacher), Miss Roberts (Teacher) 1883.

Notes: In 1858 John Henry Trinder who had been a pupil teacher at the school was made a Queen’s Scholar, being entitled to 3 years’ education at one of Her Majesty’s Training Colleges free of charge. At the annual school treat in July 1861 400 children were present in the morning when they were examinaed in Scripture by Rev H Rogers, the incumbent and in grammar, gepgraphy and arithmetic by their respective teachers. In the evening there was a substantial tea in the school room which had been decorated with flowers and mottos. In the centre was suspended a white silk banner with a bridal rosette in the middle, as a token of regard of the incumbent’s daughter, Mary Anne Rogers, who had married Thomas Byard Winter Sheppard the previous week. The banner bore the words ‘God bless our pastor’s daughter – Happiness attend her’ in blue lettering.

George Vernon was Master for 18 years and in July 1868 he left to take up the Mastership of the Earl Ducies schools at Tortworth. Several of his past students started a collection and in the end there were 169 subscribers who gave a total of £25. He was presented with an English gold lever watch with guards and appendages and there was enough left over for a pair of vases for Mrs Vernon. At the presentation on July 20th he was also awarded an illuminated text. Edward William Clevely was the second son of George and Emma Clevely. He died aged 22 in October 1884. In July 1886 Ada Reilly Sims passed the examination for admittance to Red Maids.

Notes

Henry Flower – A groom in the service of Mr Tucker of Surrey Mews. He lived at 10, Wilson Street, St Pauls. In July 1885 he was riding a horse through Cumberland Street when the animal slipped and he sustained a compound fracture of the left leg.

Wilson Terrace, Wilson Street

1. Joseph Bridges
2-3. Harriett Thomas
4. George Case
5. William Blake, tailor
6. S. Barrett, painter, etc
7. Alfred Tucker
8. James Stokes

Windmill Hill, Whitehouse Lane

Edward Edgar, beer retailer
Edward Parsons, grocer
James Webber, boot maker, Clifton view cottage
Mrs Gummer, shopkeeper
Albert Stone,
Bethel Chapel (Congregational) founded 1855.
Windmill Hill Board School. Architect A R F Trew.

Sarah Annie Jones, vict, Rising Sun Alfred Road (Windmill Hill) 1853 – 63. William Old / 1871 – 72. Sarah Jones / 1874. William Cheeseman / 1875 to 1888. William Allen / 1889 – 92. John Crossman 1896 – 1917. William Haines / 1928 – 31. James Templar / 1933 – 50. William King / 1953. Walter Lippiatt.

William Bray, vict, Friendship Windmill Hill. 1871 – 1909. William Bray / 1914. Henry Bray / 1917 – 21. Maurice Gould / 1925. Rosina Gould / 1928 – 31. Rosina Parfitt 1935 – 38. Frederick Burchill / 1950 – 53. Frederick Thorne / 1960. R. C. Loveridge / 1975. D. W. Hooper.

Edwin Griffiths, vict, Saddler’s Arms 1871. Edwin Griffiths.

(Providence Place)

Ann Callow, grocer
George Merritt, butcher

Stephen Hopper Hemmings, vict, Spotted Horse Providence Place (Mill Lane) 1842 – 58. Henry Wakefield / 1860 – 69. Samuel Barber / 1871 – 72. Stephen Hopper Hemmings / 1874 – 78. William Davey 1879. George Parker / 1881 – 97. Isaac Gould / 1899. William Brayley / 1904 – 38. Alfred Giles / 1944 – 50. Albert May 1953. Ernest Edward May.

Henry Parker, vict, Colston’s Arms Providence Place, Mill Lane. 1775. Evan Williams / 1792. John Cox / 1837 – 40. James Parker / 1842 – 87. Henry Parker / 1888 – 1901. Charles R. Parker 1904. Frederick Bishop / 1904 to 1908. William Hamlyn / 1909 – 21. Thomas Horner / 1925 – 44. Edwin Nathaniel Watkins 1950 – 53. Frederick Prideaux.

Notes

John Cox (d. January 1899) Aged 43 of Alfred Road, Windmill Hill, found dead in bed. Inquest revealed he suffered pains in his chest. Verdict cardiac failure.

John Howell (d. February 1872) He was 46 when he was found dead in a limekiln on Windmill Hill. His wife Eliza, who had been separated from him for 5 years said he had formerly been a cooper, but due to drink he had had a paralytic seizure and had been put in the workhouse.. He had however left the day before and slept in the kiln where he was found dead by George Rogers a limeburner, on arriving for work.

Windmill Hill Terrace, Windmill Hill

New Mission, Windmill Hill This was opened in August 1884. Rev Canon Mather speaking at the ceremony said many years ago he had unsuccessfully tried to get a church built in the area and was glad to see that there was now a mission rooms. It was beautiful, inexpensive but in want of so many things, not even a harmonium as the one that was there that day had been lent to them. The room was capable of holding 230 people, being 45′ 6" by 20′ 6" with a gallery at one end and a movable platform at the other. On top of the building was a gilded weathervane representing a windmill. A design for a church had been approved at that time, but money was required to carry out the building of it.

Windsor Court, Blackfriars, Lewin’s Mead

Blackfriars Board School, Maudlin Street. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: J Whippey (Master), Miss Sophia Vigor (Mistress) 1883-1865 Miss Mitchell (Mistress) 1898.

Moravian Day, Sunday and Infant Schools, Blackfriars and Maudlin Street. In 1872 for 100 boys and 100 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Mr Stockman (Master, Miss Vigor (Mistress) 1872.

Windsor Court, Temple Street

Windsor Court, Kingsland Road

Windsor Terrace, Whitehouse Lane

William H. Gregory, chemist
Thomas Webb, greengrocer
Samuel Hignell, grocer, etc

John Perrett, vict, Forester’s Arms Whitehouse Lane. 1871. James Perrett / 1872. John Perrett / 1874 – 77. James Crof / 1879 – 89. Wellington Beaven / 1891 – 1917. William Evans 1921 – 35. Arthur Evans / 1936 – 1937. Caroline Evans / 1937. Grace Johnson / 1944 – 53. Caroline Sutor.

Notes

Henry Dalton – In February 1872 he was 35 years old, a labourer of 28, Windsor Terrace, Bedminster. He had been unloading bags of sugar from the ship Zanzibar, when he stumbled and fell about 20 feet into the hold and died on the spot. An inquest was held.

Windsor Terrace, Granby Hill, near Paragon, Clifton

1. Joseph Tinn
2. Mrs McGeachey
3. Michael Castle
4. Rev. Walter J. Whiting
5. Isaac Allan Cooke
7. Henry Tayler
10. Miss P. Usher
Herbert De Winton, Windsor villa
William F. Fox, 1, Windsor place
Arthur Carter, 2, Windsor place

Windsor Terrace, St Paul’s

1. William Garrard
2. Robert Couch
3. Samuel James Toleman
4. Mary Matthews
5. Thomas Austin
6. Noah Browning
7. Charles Wathen
8. Sarah Harding
9. William Besley (police)

Windsor Terrace, Totterdown

Mark Thomas
George Richardson, shipping agent
W. Bucknell
Thomas Powell
Felix Raistrick
Charles Thomas, builder
Robert Goddard
John Wallbridge
William Paul, mason
Charles Woodman, cooper
J. L. Vincent, pianoforte tuner

Windsor Terrace, Woolcott Park

Henry Long
Benjamin Vowles
James Heard
J. R. Freeman
Charles Blackburn
Herr Voit, professor of music
George Vinney
Miss Chapple
George Towning
H. R. Wheeler
James Chard, British schoolmaster
Alfred R. Watson, professor of music
H. Evans
W. French, grocer & provision factor

Notes

George Wolfe 1834-1890 Born in Bristol, adopted in early life by a Mrs Buckley of Windsor Terrace, Clifton. Painted marine views and landscapes, oil and watercolour. On his marriage went to live in Hampshire.

Wine Street, Corn Street to Narrow Wine Street

1. Mary Bell, fishmonger & fruiterer
J. W. Trew, surveyor
F. Powell, lithographer
2-3. William and Alfred Edwards, hosiers, glovers, etc
4. Samuel Miller, stationer, fancy depot
5. George Nattriss, confectioner
6. Cotterell Brothers, paper-hangings manufacturers
7-8. O’Handlen & Co., umbrella & fishing tackle manufacturers
9. Samuel J. Burman, watch maker, etc
10. Charles M’Millan, tailor and draper
11-13. A. T. Maishman, milliner and fur manufacturer
14. Baker & Burt, ladies’ outfitters, etc
15-16. Charles and Son, tailors
17. Ridler, Coulman, & Co. Manchester warehousemen, etc
18. Joseph Vincent, brush & comb maker
19. G. Edwards and Son, outfitters
20. John Catlin, brush and comb maker
21. Edward John, hat maker
21. O. Ransford, wholesale hat maker
22. James Candy & Son, linen warehouse
23. John Stroud, chemist
24-26. John W. Langdon & Co. woollen merchants
27-28. Gray & Co., milliners, etc
29. J. Barker, glass and china warehouse
30. William Pockson & Son, fringe and fancy warehouse
31. Maurice Michael, watchmaker and pawnbroker
32. Wills, Biggs and Williams, general warehousemen
33-35. S. Weston, milliner and mantle warehouseman
36. Thomas Bale, watchmaker, etc
37. Martin Wintle, silk mercer, etc
38. Henry Peart, straw warehouse
39. Hillyer & Trew, hosiers & lacemen
40. Thomas Thompson, hosier & laceman
41. Henry Jacob Allis, watch maker
42. David Hyam, outfitter
43. Sharp and Granger, linen drapers
44. Todd and Co. outfitters
45-47. Snow and Taylor, linen drapers, silk mercers, etc
48. Coombs & Co. woollen drapers
49. J. Lodge & Co. bonnet, fur, and mantle warehouse
50-54. Baker, Baker, & Co. warehousemen, drapers, etc
55. Richard Taylor, linen draper, etc
56-60. Jones & Co. linen drapers, etc
61-62. D. P. Belfield & Son, toy & fancy goods warehouse
63-64. J. A. Hodgson, hosier and outfitter
65. J. Baker, hosier and shirt maker
66. Maurice Moore, tobacconist and foreign money exchange
67. Thomas W. Tilly, hat & umbrella maker & fancy bag dealer

Adam and Eve, Wine Street (also listed as Wine Street Passage) For sale on 19th January 1860 as in the possession of George Knowland under lease for 14 years from 14th September 1857, rent £105. Freehold and free. Listed in Inn and Commercial Tavern section.

Information on landlords: F Probart 1824 Edwin Ward 1836-40 George Knowland 1852 G Knowland 1867 George Frederick Knowland 1878 Elizabeth Knowland 1882. Notes: Richard Trotman described as ‘late landlord’ died aged 46 at Coronation Road on March 20th 1840.

Notes: Mr Knowland had a disagreement with T Jones of Jones & Co when the firm’s new store was being erected in Wine Street owing to a part of a cellar used by Mr Knowland being purchased by Mr Jones during the construction. This boiled over on 1st May 1855. Mr Jones had been celebrating a win in Chancery with a group of friends at the house of Mr McMillan, consuming half a dozen bottles of champagne between them which they decided would benefit froma a brandy and water chaser. So they went to the Adam and Eve, whereupon Mr Knowland burst out, grabbed Mr Jones by the collar, pushed him against a wall and swore that he would not enter. After asking him by letter to apologise and send an amount to the Bristol Infirmary, to which there was no reply, Mr Jones brought a case against Mr Knowland that was heard at the Tolzey Court in July. After hearing the evidence the Recorder stated that it would be better settled out of court, which was done.

In 1856 John Baker was charged at Bristol Police Court with stealing three coats from the tavern, the property of Mr Knowland, the landlord. Baker, a recruit, to whom Mr Knowland was said to have shown great kindness, was said to have confessed his guilt and to be very contrite and on the landlord.s intercession the charge was dropped and Baker handed over to his sergeant.

In January 1870 it was reported that for many years Mr Knowland had placed on the smoking tables each Saturday a box in aid of the Royal Infirmary and General Hospital, He had regularly, until recently before his health failed, shaken the box before each customer in the 2 rooms with a friendly request for a penny. The collection for 1861 amounted to 25 guineas, in 1869 was £25 4s.

Mr Knowland was also a visitor at St Peter’s Hospital and Robert James ‘a big powerful man’ who had been an inmate and knew him from this work was taken to court on 1868 for threatening him when he would not offer employment. In 1883 Mrs Knowland reported the collection boxes holding £2 12s 8d.

In March 1884 Albert O’ Brien and Albert Richards were charged with having stolen a pint measure from the pub. It was noticed by a policeman that the measure was marked with ‘Knowland, Adam and Eve’ on the side. O’Brien said that he had ordered the beer just before closing time and could not finish it all so he had taken the cup away and was going to return it the next week. They were fined 11s without costs.

Notes

George Beard – In October 1892 was charged along with his elder brother George, with stealing dress material and other goods from Messrs Jones in Wine Street. George had been employed by the firm as a porter for 2 years. A shop assistant, Helen Anstey stated that she had cut a length of dress material and put it aside and when she returned it was missing. At 6pm George asked her for paper to wrap a parcel and when she followed him the cloth was found there. He pleaded guilty and when he was accompanied to 2, Orchard Street, the Batch, where he lived other pieces of material were found there. His brother lived in 54, Goodhind Street , where more material was found.

Eliza Emily Cottrell, of Wine Street. Declared bankrupt 2nd June 1868.

Joseph Dyer – A lodging house keeper of Wine Street, inserted a notice in the newspaper, February 1818, expressing thanks to the Governor, Deputy Governor and Guardians of the Poor for not prosecuting him ‘for suffering Margaret Thomas, a single woman to lye in at my house of a Bastard Child, thus bringing a charge upon the parish of St Peter’.

Widow Foord – In 1757 was a glover. Lived near the Corn Market in Wine Street.

Catherine Forster (d. 18th January 1805) Eldest daughter of Mr Joseph Forster formerly an apothecary in Wine Street. Died in her 30th year of a consumption ‘as did her two sisters, a few years past.’ according to obituary notice.

Ralph Oliff – Landlord of the Three Tuns In Wine Street. Was sheriff in 1664 and mayor in 1673 and it is claimed he said he took office ‘solely to persecute the Nonconformists.’ Died aged 64 and was buried in the chancel of All Saints.

Mrs Oxley – In 1827 she and three of her children perished in a fire in Wine Street.

Philip Scapulis (d. 1590) Originally from Trier, a stationer lived in Wine Street. In 1577 he was involved (with others) in a dispute with the Attorney General regarding whether their houses which had previously belonged to the Merchant Tailors’ Guild were therefore property of the Crown It was decided by jury that this was not the case. Wife Elizabeth, daughter Margaret, who was born in 1581 and died 4 years later. It is unlikely that he had any other children as they are not mentioned in his will which left bequests to cousins and godsons, neighbours and an ex-apprentice Richard Foorde.

Businesses Wine Street

The Don, 45 and 46 Wine Street (Clothing) The Bristol branch of the Don opened in 1883 under Manager W H Forsyth, who presided over a staff of 30. was one of many in towns throughout England. The upper floor housed workrooms, where at the end of the 19th century sewing machines were ‘driven by an engine, also acting as the motor for the dynamo forming the generator for the electric light installation.’ The height of technology in the high street.

While bespoke tailoring was carried on using these sewing machines, the ready to wear items were made at Stroud. This enabled them to charge the customer only one shilling per ready-made item over the cost price. The handsome premises were destroyed during the Second World War, although the company carried on. Moving to the top of Park Street, particularly noted in the later years as recommended suppliers of school uniforms.

Parnall & Sons, Narrow Wine Street Parnall’s – much more than shop fitters, although this advertisement was specifically aimed at the grocery trade.

H G Parnall founded the business in 1820 and in 1893 it was being described as ‘immense’, having become a limited company some four years earlier. As well as the main warehouse and showroom in Narrow Wine Street, the company had an iron and brass foundry at Rosemary Street and a steam joinery at Fairfax Street. Scales and weighing machines (including the Patent National Balances invented by Mr Parnall and 20,000 sold between 1883 and 1893) were manufactured at Fishponds. The Patent Agate Hand Scales were described as ‘specially worthy of the attention of tea dealers……when suspended above the counter they will work three times as long as any other scale without getting out of order’.

The wide range of items manufactured and supplied also included weighbridges (suitable for railway companies, collieries and public corporations), scoops, sack lifters, barrows and trucks, canisters (in large variety), counter boxes and window show trays, show glasses, butchers’ and other warranted cutlery, marble top tables (for restaurants etc), show stands, treacle cisterns, safes and cash boxes, patent tills, provision tickets, window name plates, tobacco cutters and tobacconists’ fixtures, chairs, bottling machines hand carts, coffee mills, tea mixers, hoists, lifts and gas engines.

They employed 10 representatives on the road and 400 workmen.

Winscombe Buildings, Frogmore Street

Winscombe Court. Frogmore Street

Winsford Street, Pennywell Road, Stapleton Road

Joseph Thorley, painter, etc
Thomas Curtis, tailor, etc
Mary Gapper, greengrocer, etc
James H. Cole, grocer & tea dealer
George Woolley
Mrs Mary Young
Charles Turner, mariner
Charles Shapland
Thomas Rutley, shoe maker
Joseph Snell, tanner, etc
Alfred Johnson, mechanic
William Rowe
Fitzroy Robert Colborne, painter and glazier
John Jennings, baker
Simeon Millman, tea dealer

Mary Jenkins,vict, Pine Apple Pennywell Road. In 1881 Mary Jenkins described herself as ‘publican – out of business’. 1853. Robert Fewing / 1854. Mary Fewing / 1861 – 66. James Webber / 1867 – 79. Mary Jenkins / 1883 – 1904. William Whitaker 1909 – 21. Charles Tristram / 1925 – 38. Henry Castle / 1944 – 53. Edith Holbrook (James Webber was a publican, and potato dealer).

Winsley Villas, Coburg Road, Montpelier

Woburn Place, near Grenville Place, Hotwells

Woodbury Place, Black Boy Hill

Woodbury Terrace, Blackboy Hill

Woodland Road, Tyndall‘s Park to Cotham Road

Miss Butt, Bannerleigh house
James Proctor, Moreton house
Robert H. Symes, Carlton house
Capt. Charles Mallard, R.N. Dundonald house
Thomas N. Harwood
Augustus Phillips, Lansdown house
J. S. Marchant, Somerville house
William Sturge, Chilliswood house
John Hill Morgan, Parklands house
Alfred Gardiner, Dale villa

Iron Church In the fashionable suburb of Clifton, amid the large villas, a mission church was built of iron in 1865. Plans were drawn up for a permanent church by the celebrated architect James Piers St Aubyn, his only church in Bristol, and building was slow, 1870-81. His planned steeple, similar in appearance to that built at Christ Church, never rose above the basement stage and serves as a rather enormous NW porch.

Concerns about the stability of the building brought in John Bevan and he rebuilt part of the nave and chancel, completed 1909. It survived in use until 1976 when the parish was joined to St Saviour. The joint parish purchased the redundant Highbury Chapel c1975 which in turn was restored and rededicated to St Saviour & St Mary, Cotham to replace both buildings. The BBC purchased the Tyndall’s Park church for use as a scenery store. The interior was subdivided and a new entrance created in the north aisle. The church was acquired in the mid-1990s by a free-church congregation, and now in use as the Woodlands Christian Centre. Work began in July 2000 to convert the upper floor into supported housing and the ground floor is to be retained for worship.

Houses

Abergeldie, Woodland Road, Clifton No 19 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Bannerleigh, Woodland Road, Clifton No 15 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Carlton House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 11 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Dundonald House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 9 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Gordon Lodge, Woodland Road, Clifton No 17 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Woodland Terrace, Hampton Road to Auburn Road

1. David Clarke Lindsey
2. Miss Eliza Peters
3. M. A. H. Wood
5. Caroline Ridgway
6. Edward Joseph Heyre

Woodwell Cottages, White Hart Lane

Woodwell Crescent, Jacob’s Wells

Woolcott Buildings, Lower Redland Road to Clyde Road

1. William Pincott
2. John Guppy
3. Benjamin Hall, grocer
4. Mrs Boxwell
5. Thomas Gammon
6. George Morgan, dairyman
7. George Parsons
8. James Carp
9. Walter Mizen, junior
10. Walter Mizen, senior
11. John Shorland, carpenter
12. Maurice Taylor, carpenter and stationer
13. Jeremiah Wicks
14. John Henson, boot maker
15. John Bool
16. William John Woodman
17. Enos Boulter
18. ?. Fear
19. John Knight
20. Enoch Ford
21. Isaac House, greengrocer & fruiterer, Fairfield cottage
22. Thomas Roberts, dairyman
23. T. Roberts, teacher of the piano, etc
24. Mrs Ann Ricketts
Miss Catherine Downs, dressmaker
William Johns
John Smith

Thomas Skyrme, vict, Shakespeare Tavern Lower Redland Road 1867 – 75. Thomas Skyrme / 1876 – 83. Emma Skyrme / 1885 – 92. Jane Marie Tavener / 1894 – 1928. Jane Marie Row 1931 – 35. John Pullen / 1937 – 50. William Hardwell / 1953. Lily Rose / 1975. A. T. H. Bryant Jane Marie Tavener/Rowe was the niece of Thomas and Emma Skyrme.

Woolcott Park, Clyde Road to Lover’s Walk

Uriah Mullett, dairyman & haulier
William Knowles, Rhosven lodge
Albert Gribble, Wynn house
Robert Acton Dodds, Gordon house
?. Stockwell house
Capt. Thomas W. Hives, Marlbro’ villa
George Gatchell, Carrville villa
Mrs Frankland Evelyn villa
W. B. Morgan, Brockley villa
Mrs Mary Harris, Merton villa
Mrs Hannah Hall, Eversley house
Alfred Albert Holmes, Northcote house
Arthur G. Heaven, Lyndhurst villa
Mrs Francis Gatchell, Sunnyside villa
Alfred P. Menefy, Dunmore villa
Mrs John Dix, Penmaen villa
Mrs Mary Ann Williams, Kingmead villa
Christopher Pocklington, Didsbury villa
William Arthur Leonard, Woolbury villa
John Clarke Wallop, Innisville villa
Miss C. Dickenson, Sidney lodge
George Young Home, Roseville villa
James Bailey, Sidney house
Mrs Edmond Gill, Old Cleve house
?. Rock house
Edwin Tardrew, Newlands villa
Henry Wansborough, Bewdley villa
?. Ahorn house
James Buck, Brookville lodge
Jesse Harris, Clarefont house
Eliza Knowles, Myrtle lodge
Dennis Fairchild, Melrose villa
Miss Chard, Gouldnappe house
?. Fripp, Carr villa

St Saviour’s Infant School, Woolcott Park. In 1898 for 100 children. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Misss A Coombe (Mistress) 1898.

Charles Seaman – Living at 6. Leigh Villas, Woolcott Park when prosecuted by Bristol School Board in January 1875 for not sending children to school and fined 3 shillings.

Woolcott Park Terrace, Woolcott Park

George Henry Pike, Gifford lodge
Mrs Isabella Butler, Wilton villa
Christopher Waltham Porter
Miss Morgan, ladies’ school

Worcester Crescent, College Road (South)

Woodforde Ffookes
Joseph B. Powell
Admlral James Vashon Baker
Graham Campbell
Mrs Radcliffe
Montagu Gilbert Blackburn
Miss Elizabeth Salmon

Worcester Lawn, College Road (South)

Joseph L. Roeckel, professor of music
Rev. Beedam Charlesworth
Mrs Christian C. Jones
Dr. George Thompson

Worcester Terrace, Clifton Park

Frederick William Badock, Badminton house
Misses Haycock
Henry Pritchard
Charles Stewart Clarke
Rev. Nicholas Pocock
Rev. F. Vaughan Mather
William Edward Fox
Lady Molyneaux
Arthur Montague
Mrs Catherine Span
Robert Dow Ker
Rev. Philip Ashby Phalps
Gwinnett Tyler

Sshools Clifton Park

Anna Maria Notley & Louisa Nascele Harris, school, Worcester House, Worcester Terrace.

Miss Bartlett’s School for Young Ladies, Badminton House, Clifton park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

Clifton High School for Girls, Clifton Park, Clifton.

A R Douglas’ School for Young Gentlemen, Colchester House, Clifton Park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

Worcester Villas, College Road (South)

Francis Black, M.D. Worcester lodge
William Killegrew Wait
George Wills
Major Owen, Barham lodge
Swinfen Jordan, Cherith lodge

Wordsworth Terrace, Woolcott Park

World’s End, White Hart Steps, Jacob’s Wells

Worrall’s Road, Caroline Row, Durdham Down

Wright’s Court, Pipe Lane, Temple Street

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Good Prototypes Suppliers China photos

Check out these prototypes suppliers china pictures:

Tupolev Tu-4
prototypes suppliers china
Image by Peer.Gynt
Monino Central Air Force Museum (Moscow) July 2010

The Tupolev Tu-four (NATO reporting name: Bull) was a piston-engined Soviet strategic bomber that served the Soviet Air Force from the late 1940s to mid-1960s. It was a reverse-engineered copy of the U.S.-produced Boeing B-29 Superfortress.
Towards the end of Planet War II, the Soviet Union saw the need to have for a strategic bombing capability related to that of the United States Army Air Forces. The Soviet VVS air arm did have their personal-design and style Petlyakov Pe-eight 4-engined &quotheavy&quot in service at the start off of the war, but only 93 have been built by the finish of the war as the sort had been equipped with unreliable turbocharged V12 diesel engines at the start of its service to give it lengthy range. The U.S. regularly performed bombing raids on Japan, extremely close to the Soviet Union’s borders, from distant Pacific forward bases making use of B-29 Superfortresses. Joseph Stalin ordered the development of a comparable bomber.

The U.S. twice refused to provide the Soviet Union with B-29s under Lend Lease. Nonetheless, on 4 occasions for the duration of 1944, individual B-29s created emergency landings in Soviet territory and one crashed right after the crew bailed out. In accordance with the Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, the Soviets were neutral in the Pacific War and the bombers have been as a result interned and kept by the Soviets. Despite Soviet neutrality, America demanded the return of the bombers, but the Soviets refused. Three repairable B-29s had been flown to Moscow and delivered into Tupolev OKB. A single B-29 was dismantled, the second was employed for flight tests and education, and the third one was left as a regular for cross-reference. With the Soviet declaration of war against Japan in accordance with the Yalta agreement to enter the war inside 90 days of VE day (to permit it time to move its forces from Europe to Asia) at about 11pm on August eight, 1945 — two days right after the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima and the subsequent entente with Japan ending, the fourth B-29 was returned to the US along with its crew.

Stalin tasked Tupolev with cloning the Superfortress in as short a time as feasible rather of continuing with his personal comparable ANT-64 or samolet (aircraft) 64, and Soviet market was to make 20 copies of the aircraft ready for State acceptance trials in just two years.

The Soviet Union utilized the metric system, therefore sheet aluminum in thicknesses matching the B-29’s imperial measurements have been unavailable. The corresponding metric-gauge metal was of distinct thicknesses. Alloys and other materials new to the Soviet Union had to be brought into production. Extensive re-engineering had to take spot to compensate for the differences, and Soviet official strength margins had to be decreased to stay away from additional redesign,[9] however regardless of these challenges the prototype Tu-4 only weighed about 750 lb (340 kg) a lot more than the B-29, a distinction of significantly less than 1%.

The engineers and suppliers of elements have been beneath pressure from Tupolev, Stalin, and the government to create an exact clone of the original B-29 to facilitate production and Tupolev had to overcome substantial resistance in favor of employing equipment that was not only already in production but in some circumstances much better than the American version. Every single element created and every alteration was scrutinized and was subject to a lengthy bureaucratic method. Variations were restricted to the engines, the defensive weapons, the radio (a later model employed in lend-lease B-25s was utilized in location of the radio in the interned B-29s) and the identification friend or foe (IFF) system – the American IFF being unsuitable. The Soviet engine, the Shvetsov ASh-73 was a improvement of the Wright R-1820 but was not otherwise connected to the B-29s Wright R-3350. and the remote-controlled gun turrets have been redesigned to accommodate the harder hitting and longer ranged Soviet Nudelman NS-23 23mm cannon. Kerber, Tupolev’s deputy at the time, recalled in his memoirs that engineers necessary authorization from a higher-ranking common to use Soviet-created parachutes. Added modifications were created as a outcome of issues encountered during testing, associated to engine and propeller failures and gear changes had been created all through the aircraft’s service life. Despite the fact that it has been widely quoted, the Tu-four did not have a random hole drilled in the wing either to emulate a bullet hole or simply because a Boeing engineer made a error – the Russians had 3 complete aircraft and the wreckage of a fourth and the likelihood of all four possessing a hole in the very same spot is also small to be credible. The aircraft included 1 Boeing-Witchita −5-BW, 2 Boeing-Witchita −15-BWs and the wreckage of 1 Boeing-Renton −1-BN – 3 various models from two diverse production lines. Only 1 of the 4 had de-icing boots as utilised on the Tu-4.

The Tu-4 initial flew on 19 Might 1947, piloted by test pilot Nikolai Rybko. Serial production began quickly, and the variety entered huge-scale service in 1949. Entry into service of the Tu-four threw the USAF into a panic, given that the Tu-four possessed adequate variety to attack Chicago or Los Angeles on a one particular-way mission, and this may have informed the maneuvers and air combat practice conducted by US and British air forces in 1948 involving fleets of B-29s. Some attempts to develop midair refueling systems were made to extend the bomber’s variety, but these had been fitted to only a handful of aircraft.
The aircraft was 1st displayed for the duration of a flyover at the Aviation Day parade on 3 August 1947 at the Tushino Airport in Moscow. 3 aircraft flew overhead. It was assumed that these were merely the 3 B-29 bombers that have been recognized to have been diverted to the USSR throughout Globe War II. Minutes later a fourth aircraft appeared. Western analysts realized that the Soviets should have reverse-engineered the B-29. The appearance of an certainly Superfortress-derived Tu-70 transport over the crowd removed any doubt about the accomplishment of the reverse-engineering.
Eight hundred and forty-seven Tu-4s had been constructed when production ended in the Soviet Union in 1952, some going to China for the duration of the later 1950s. Numerous experimental variants have been constructed and the valuable knowledge launched the Soviet strategic bomber system. Tu-4s had been withdrawn in the 1960s, being replaced by much more advanced aircraft: the Tupolev Tu-16 (beginning in 1954) and the Tupolev Tu-95 (starting in 1956). By the starting of the 1960s, the only Tu-4s nonetheless operated by the Soviets were used for transport or airborne laboratory purposes. A Tu-4A was the 1st Soviet aircraft to drop a nuclear weapon, the RDS-1.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Cool Speedy Prototyping Design photos

Verify out these rapid prototyping style photos:

FlashforgeFinder_Bild03_5184x2912
rapid prototyping design
Image by Creative Tools
finder.creativetools.se

The colourful Flashforge Finder desktop 3D printer – ideal for specialists, hobbyists and schools. Quiet, effectively-developed, secure and inexpensive.

FlashforgeFinder_Bild09_5184x2912
rapid prototyping design
Image by Inventive Tools
finder.creativetools.se

The colourful Flashforge Finder desktop 3D printer – excellent for professionals, hobbyists and schools. Quiet, nicely-made, secure and inexpensive.


rapid prototyping design
Image by pennstatenews
Student Shawn D. Wagner explains his team’s cheddar-shaped mousetrap design, developed on a speedy-prototyping machine.

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