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“Old Fashioned British Sweets From Your Childhood”
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Image by brizzle born and bred
1953: Sweet rationing ends in Britain

Children all over Britain have been emptying out their piggy-banks and heading straight for the nearest sweet-shop as the first unrationed sweets went on sale today. Toffee apples were the biggest sellers, with sticks of nougat and liquorice strips also disappearing fast.

One firm in Clapham Common gave 800 children 150lbs of lollipops during their midday break from school, and a London factory opened its doors to hand out free sweets to all comers.

Adults joined in the sugar frenzy, with men in the City queuing up in their lunch breaks to buy boiled sweets and to enjoy the luxury of being able to buy 2lb boxes of chocolates to take home for the weekend.

Do you remember your favourite childhood sweets and the excitement of going to the local sweet shop and choosing from the vast array of jars on the shelves full of colourful mouth watering temptations?

They were weighed by the quarter on a big old fashioned metal scale pan and packaged into small white paper bags.

For many of us, the Saturday ritual of sweets-buying has lingered into adulthood, and it is heartening to find so many places selling from jars. Indeed, the Bonds sweets factory in Carlisle – a major supplier – is planning to redesign its plastic jars to be squatter and wider than usual: an echo of the prewar shape. Multicoloured jars lined up on shelves are very alluring, for many of us a potent reminder of a time when the local sweet shop represented a kind of El Dorado.

If you thought it was just kids who ate sugar confectionery you’d be wide of the mark. Many of the lines might have been developed for children but prove a hit with adults, too. Even the tough guys (and gals) in the British armed forces love their sweets according to NAAFI figures, servicemen and women in Afghanistan last year munched their way through 923,583 bags of Haribo.

Here in the UK, sweetie buying habits change as we hopefully head towards warmer weather, with more people opting for fruity sweets rather than chocolate bars.

THE SWEETS GRAVEYARD

Spangles

Dimpled, square boiled sweets in fruit-flavoured and Old English varieties. Spangles was a brand of boiled sweets, manufactured by Mars Ltd in the United Kingdom from 1950 to the early eighties. They were bought in a paper tube with individual sweets cellophane wrapped. They were distinguished by their shape which was a rounded square with a circular depression on each face.

The regular Spangles tube (labelled simply "Spangles") contained a variety of translucent, fruit flavoured sweets: strawberry, blackcurrant, orange, pineapple, lemon and lime.

Originally the sweets were not individually wrapped, but later a waxed paper, and eventually a cellophane wrapper was used. The tube was a bright orange-red colour, bearing the word "Spangles" in a large letters. In the seventies a distinctive, seventies-style font was used.

Over the production period many different, single flavour varieties were introduced including Acid Drop, Barley Sugar, Blackcurrant, Liquorice, Peppermint, Spearmint and Tangerine.

The Old English Spangles tube contained traditional English flavours such as liquorice, mint humbugs, cough candy, butterscotch and pear drops. One of the flavours was an opaque mustard yellow colour, and one was striped.

The sweets’ individual wrappers were striped, distinguishing them from regular Spangles. The tube was black, white and purple, and designed for a more mature and specific clientele than the regular variety.

Spangles were discontinued in the early eighties, and briefly reintroduced in 1994, including in Woolworths outlets in the UK. There are many nostalgic references to them from children who grew up with them. Spangles are associated with the 1970s and they, like Space Hoppers or the Raleigh Chopper, have become shorthand for lazy nostalgia for the time, as in the phrase "Do you remember Spangles?"

Today the Tunes brand is the only remaining relation of the Spangles brand, sharing the shape and wrapping of the original product. In the UK, Tunes no longer have the Spangles style packaging, and they are now lozenge-shaped.

Cabana bar

Very sweet coconut-centred chocolate bar with cherry twist made by Cadbury’s.

Pineapple Mars

This early tropical-flavoured prototype was not a lasting success

Fry’s Five Centres

Follow-up to famous Fry’s Five Boys. Fry’s Cream is a chocolate bar made by Cadbury’s, and formerly by J. S. Fry & Sons. It consists of a fondant centre enrobed in dark chocolate and is available in a plain version, and also peppermint or orange fondant. Fry’s Chocolate Cream was one of the first chocolate bars ever produced, launched in 1866.

There are currently three variants of Fry’s Cream:

Fry’s Chocolate Cream
Fry’s Orange Cream
Fry’s Peppermint Cream

Over the years, other variants existed:

Fry’s Five Centre (orange, raspberry, lime, strawberry, and pineapple), produced from 1934 to 1992.

Fry’s Strawberry Cream
Fry’s Pineapple Cream

Cadbury’s also produced a solid milk chocolate bar called Five Boys using the Fry’s trademark in the 1960s. Cadbury’s produced milk and plain chocolate sandwich bars under the Fry’s branding also.

Fry’s chocolate bar was promoted by model George Lazenby, later James Bond actor, in 1962.

The Fry’s Chocolate bar was first produced in Union Street, Bristol, England in 1866, where the family name had been associated with chocolate making since circa 1759. In 1923 Fry’s (now Cadbury) chocolate Factory moved to Keynsham, England, but due to the imminent closure of the factory the production of the bar will move, possibly to Poland.

Banjo bar

Banjo is a chocolate bar once available in the UK. Introduced with a substantial television advertising campaign in 1976, Banjo was a twin bar (similar in shape and size to Twix) and based upon a wafer with a chopped peanut layer and the whole covered in milk chocolate. It was packaged in distinctive navy blue – with the brand name prominently displayed in yellow block text – and was one of the first British snack bars to have a heat-sealed wrapper closure instead of the reverse-side fold common to most domestically-produced chocolate bars at that time. It was available into the 1980s. There was a coconut version also available in a red wrapper with yellow text.

Aztec bars

So many sweet lovers would love to be able to enjoy Aztec bars again. Sadly it isn’t possible to buy Aztec bars at the moment. It was like a Mars Bar but not as sickly because it had nougat instead of toffee. It had a purple wrapper it was made by Cadbury’s.

Opal Fruits

Mars, the manufacturers, is bringing back the sweets for a limited period in conjunction with the supermarket chain ASDA.

The fruit chews that were "made to make you mouth water" were replaced by Starburst in 1998, the name under which they had been exported to the US in the seventies.

But the iconic British brand is being revived in celebration of the tenth anniversary of the change.

They will be available for an initial period of 12 weeks from May 10, exclusively in ASDA stores.

A spokesperson for ASDA said: "The demise of the Opal Fruit was mourned across the nation, and we’re really excited to be staging the exclusive comeback of this great British favourite."

Opal Fruits were initially introduced in Britain in the 1960s.

In 1998, the US brand Starburst was adopted in England in order to standardise the brand in the global marketplace.

Expectations are high that the move to bring back Opal Fruits will be popular with consumers.

As well as reverting to the original flavours of lemon, lime, orange and strawberry, the new Opal Fruits will be a strictly natural affair.

The limited edition will be produced using no artificial colouring or preservatives, a move that both ASDA and Mars hope will appeal to twenty-first century customers.

The return of Opal Fruits continues the recent trend of reviving classic brands.

Cadbury reintroduced the Wispa last year after an internet campaign which also involved protesters storming a stage at the Glastonbury festival.

Sherbert Fountain

Sherbet is sold in a plastic tube with twist-off lid, with a stick made from liquorice as a sherbet fountain. Many consumers regret the replacement of the former paper packaging, which allowed an extra dimension of enjoyment: the crushing of the caked lumps of sherbet as the paper cylinder was rolled between the hands. The top of the stick is supposed to be bitten off to form a straw and the sherbet sucked through it, where it fizzes and dissolves on the tongue, though many people prefer to either dip the liquorice in the sherbet and lick it off or to tip the sherbet into their mouths and eat the liquorice separately.

When paired with liquorice, sherbet is typically left unflavoured in a white form and with a higher reactive agent so that it causes a fizzy foam to develop in the mouth.

They are manufactured by Barratt, a subsidiary of Tangerine Confectionery.

Though some shops still sell the old-style only.

Sherbert Flying Saucers

These small pastel coloured rice paper sweets were shaped like a U.F.O. and contained delightfully fizzy sherbet.

Small dimpled discs made from edible coloured paper (rice paper), typically filled with white unflavoured sherbet (the same form as in Sherbet Fountains) These sweets had sherbert in the middle and a kind of melt-in-your-mouth outer shell.

Black Jacks Chews

Black Jack is a type of "aniseed flavour chew" according to its packaging. This means that it is a chewy (gelatin-based) confectionery. Black Jack is manufactured under the Barratt brand in Spain. Black Jack is very similar to Fruit Salad, which are also manufactured by Barratt.

Black Jacks are one of the most well-known classic British sweets. They`re aniseed-flavoured, chewy and black with a unique taste, and they make your tongue go black!

The original labels from the 1920’s pictured a grinning gollywog – unbelievably, back then images of black people were used to advertise Liquorice. This is seen as unacceptable today, of course, and by the late 80s manufacturers Trebor deleted the golly logo. It was replaced by a pirate with a black beard.

In the early 1990s the pirate logo was replaced by a rather boring black and white swirl design.

Cabana bars

Cabana bars died out in about 1984, and as they were made by Rowntree (sold to Nestle in 1989) they’re very unlikely to make a comeback.

Licorice Bootlaces

Long thin strips of licorice in the shape of boot laces.

Pineapple Chunks

Pineapple Flavour Hard Boiled Sweets.

Jamboree Bag

Bags of different sorts of sweets, with dodgy plastic toys and whistles etc, where are they now?

Rhubarb & Custard

Rhubarb and Custard flavoured boiled sweet, with it’s two colours.

Gobstoppers

Gobstoppers, known as jawbreakers in Canada and the United States, are a type of hard sweet or candy. They are usually round, usually range from about 1 cm across to 3 cm across (though much bigger gobstoppers can sometimes be found in Canadian/US candy stores, up to 8 cm in diameter) and are traditionally very hard.

The term gobstopper derives from ‘gob’, which is United Kingdom/Ireland slang for mouth.

Gobstoppers usually consist of several layers, each layer dissolving to reveal a different colored (and sometimes different flavoured) layer, before dissolving completely. Gobstoppers are sucked or licked, being too hard to bite without risking dental damage (hence the US title).

Gobstoppers have been sold in traditional sweet shops for at least a century, often sold by weight from jars. As gobstoppers dissolve very slowly, they last a very long time in the mouth, which is a major factor in their enduring popularity with children. Larger ones can take days or even weeks to fully dissolve, risking a different kind of dental damage.

In 2003, Taquandra Diggs, a nine year old girl in Starke, Florida, suffered severe burns, allegedly from biting down on a Wonka Everlasting Gobstopper that had been left out in the sun. Diggs and several other victims’ families filed lawsuits against Nestlé for medical bills resulting from plastic surgery as well as pain and suffering; the matters were later settled outside of court for an undisclosed amount.

A 2004 episode of the Discovery Channel television program "Myth Busters" episode subsection named Exploding Jawbreakers then demonstrated that heating a gobstopper in a microwave oven can cause the different layers inside to heat at different rates, yielding an explosive spray of very hot candy when compressed; Myth Busters crew members Adam Savage and Christine Chamberlain received light burns after a gobstopper exploded.

Acid Drops

Tongue-tinglingly sharp boiled sweets.

Barley Sugar

Barley sugar (or barley sugar candy) is a traditional variety of British boiled sweet, or hard candy, yellow or orange in colour with an extract of barley added as flavouring. It is similar to hard caramel candy in its texture and taste.

Barley sugars and other energy sweets are the only food allowed to be eaten in the New Zealand & Australian 40 Hour Famine, an annual event which draws attention to world hunger. A single barley sugar is allowed to be consumed once every 4 hours during the 40 Hour Famine. This applies to participants older than primary school age.

Bulls Eyes Humbug

Humbugs are a traditional hard boiled sweet available in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. They are usually flavoured with peppermint and striped in two different colours (often brown and tan). They have a hard outside and a soft toffee centre. Humbugs are typically cylinders with rounded ends wrapped in a twist of cellophane, or else pinched cylinders with a 90-degree turn between one end and the other (shaped like a pyramid with rounded edges), loose in a bag.

They are more often eaten in winter than summer, as they are considered "warming." The name of the candy is not related to the phrase "Bah, humbug" derived from Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. That expression implies a general dissatisfaction with the Christmas season. However, offering humbugs around Christmas time is now seen by some as humorous or ironic, and was featured in an episode of Blackadder in this manner.

A similar sweet is "bulls-eye" which has black and white stripes like a humbug but is spherical like an aniseed ball. These are peppermint flavoured and are also known as bullets in the UK as they are similar in size to smoothbore musket balls.

Love Hearts

Love Hearts are a type of confectionery manufactured by Swizzels Matlow in the United Kingdom. They are hard, fizzy, tablet-shaped sweets in a variety of fruit flavours featuring a short, love-related message on one side of the sweet.

The sweets are small and circular, approximately 19 mm in diameter, and 5 mm in height (including the embossed decorations). Both sides are embossed with a decoration, the rear with a large outline of a heart and the front with the message within an outline of a heart. On the front of the sweet the embossing is highlighted with a red colouring.

The main body of the sweet is coloured in one of the 6 colours – white, yellow, orange, green, purple or red. Especially for the darker red and purple colourings this colouring is somewhat blotchy.

Fruit Salads

Fruit Salad is a type of "Raspberry & Pineapple flavour chew" according to its packaging. This means that it is a chewy (gelatin-based) confectionery. Fruit Salad is manufactured by Barratt in Spain. Fruit Salad is very similar to Black Jack, which are also manufactured by Barratt.

Sweet ‘Cigarette’ Sticks

(sticks wrapped in paper, in packs that looked just like real cigarettes)

Candy cigarettes is a candy introduced in the early 20th century made out of chalky sugar, bubblegum or chocolate, wrapped in paper as to resemble cigarettes. Their place on the market has long been controversial because many critics believe the candy desensitizes children, leading them to become smokers later in life. Because of this, the selling of candy cigarettes has been banned in several countries such as Finland, Norway, the Republic of Ireland, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

In the United States a ban was considered in 1970 and again in 1991, but was not passed into federal law. The U.S. state of North Dakota enacted a ban on candy cigarettes from 1953 until 1967. In Canada federal law prohibits candy cigarette branding that resembles real cigarette branding and the territory of Nunavut has banned all products that resemble cigarettes.

The Family Smoking and Prevention Control Act was misquoted as banning candy cigarettes. The Act bans any form of added flavoring in tobacco cigarettes other than menthol. It does not regulate the candy industry.

Candy cigarettes continue to be manufactured and consumed in many parts of the world. However, many manufacturers now describe their products as candy sticks, bubble gum, or candy.

Popeye Cigarettes marketed using the Popeye character were sold for a while and had red tips (to look like a lit cigarette) before being renamed candy sticks and being manufactured without the red tip.

Liquorice "Smoker’s Sets"

Sweet smokers sets with sweet cigarettes, tobacco and liquorice pipes. CONCERNS have been raised about the availability of candy-style imitation cigarettes. The sweets, which look remarkably like a hand-rolled cigarette and packaged in replica cigarette packets.

"Recently there has been a trend for buying so-called retro candy such as aniseed balls and spangles. It’s unfortunate that chocolate cigarettes have re surfaced but it’s not illegal to sell them and it’s really up to retailers to decide whether or not it’s a product with which they wish to be associated."

Aniseed Balls

Aniseed balls are a type of hard round sweet sold in the UK, New Zealand and Australia. They are shiny and dark brownish red, and hard like Gobstoppers.

Aniseed Balls are something you either love or hate! They are flavoured by aniseed oil (obviously!), and have a very strong aniseed flavour. They last for a long time in the mouth before dissolving and in the centre of the ball is a whole rapeseed that can be crushed.

Butterscotch

Butterscotch is a type of confectionery whose primary ingredients are brown sugar and butter, although other ingredients such as corn syrup, cream, vanilla, and salt are part of some recipes.

The ingredients for butterscotch are similar to toffee, but for butterscotch the sugar is boiled to the soft crack stage, and not hard crack as with toffee. Butterscotch sauce is often made into a syrup, which is used as a topping for ice cream (particularly sundaes).

The term butterscotch is also often used for the flavour of brown sugar and butter together even where actual confection butterscotch is not involved, e.g. butterscotch pudding.

Food historians have several theories regarding the name and origin of this confectionery, but none are conclusive. One explanation is the meaning "to cut or score" for the word "scotch", as the confection must be cut into pieces, or "scotched", before hardening. It is also possible that the "scotch" part of its name was derived from the word "scorch".

However, the word was first recorded in Doncaster, in England, where Samuel Parkinson began making the confectionery in 1817. Parkinson’s Butterscotch had royal approval and was one of Doncaster’s attractions until it ceased production in 1977. The recipe was revived in 2003 when a Doncaster businessman and his wife rediscovered the recipe on an old folded piece of paper inside one of the famous St Leger tins in their cellar.

Butterscotch is an example of a genericized trademark, originally a trademark of Parkinson’s.

Jelly Babies

Jelly babies are a type of soft confectionery that look like little babies in a variety of colours. There are currently several companies that make jelly babies, most predominantly Trebor Bassett (part of the Cadbury Group of companies, and famous for their liquorice allsorts) and also Rowntree (Nestlé).

Jelly Babies were launched by Bassett’s in 1918 in Sheffield as "Peace Babies" to mark the end of World War I. Production was suspended during World War II due to wartime shortages and the fact that the name had largely become ironic. In 1953 the product was relaunched as "Jelly Babies". In March 1989 Bassett’s were taken over by Cadbury Schweppes who had earlier acquired the Trebor brand.

Jelly Babies manufactured in the United Kingdom tend to be dusted in starch which is left over from the manufacturing process where it is used to aid release from the mould. Jelly Babies of Australian manufacture generally lack this coating.

Like many gummy sweets, they contain gelatin and are thus not suitable for vegetarians.

A popular science class experiment is to put them in a strong oxidising agent and see the resulting spectacular reaction. The experiment is commonly referred to as "Screaming jelly babies".

Each Bassett’s Jelly Baby now has an individual name and shape, colour and flavour: Brilliant (red – strawberry), Bubbles (yellow – lemon), Baby Bonny (pink – raspberry), Boofuls (green – lime), Bigheart (purple – blackcurrant) and Bumper (orange). The introduction of different shapes and names was a new innovation, circa 1989, prior to which all colours of jelly baby were a uniform shape.

Jelly Babies are similar in appearance to Gummi bears, which are better known outside of the United Kingdom, though the texture is different, Jelly Babies having a harder outer "crust" and a softer, less rubbery, centre.

In 2007, Bassett’s Jelly Babies changed to include only natural colours and ingredients.

In the early 1960s, after Beatles guitarist George Harrison revealed in an interview that he liked jelly babies, audiences showered him and the rest of the band with the sweets at live concerts and fans sent boxes of them as gifts.[citation needed] Unfortunately American fans could not obtain this soft British confection, replacing them with harder jelly beans instead. To the group’s discomfort, they were frequently pelted with jelly beans during concerts while in America.

Jelly babies are popular with several of the Doctors in the television series Doctor Who. The Second Doctor was the first to have them in his pockets. The Fourth Doctor had them throughout his time on the show. They also appear briefly with the Tenth Doctor In the 2007 episode "The Sound of Drums", The Master is seen eating them.

Dolly mixture

This is a British confection, consisting of a variety of multi-coloured fondant shapes, such as cubes and cylinders, with subtle flavourings. The mixtures also include hard-coated fondants in "round edged cube" shapes and sugar coated jellies. They are sold together, in a mixture in a medium-sized packet. It is produced by various companies in different countries; the most popular brands are those produced by Trebor Bassett (now a part of the Cadbury’s consortium)

Bonbons

The name bonbon (or bon-bon) stems from the French word bon, literally meaning “good”. In modern usage, the term "bonbon" usually refers to any of several types of sweets and other table centerpieces across the world.

The first bonbons come from the 17th century when they were made at the royal court especially for children who were eating them and chanting bon, bon!, French for good, good!.

Bonbon is also a colloquial expression (as in, "She sat around all day eating bon-bons while her husband was at work."). This sweet inspired Johann Strauss II to compose a waltz named, "Wiener Bonbons".

Chewits

Chewits is the brand name of a chewy, cuboid-shaped, soft taffy candy manufactured by Leaf International.

Chewits was launched in the UK in 1965. The sweets were originally manufactured in Southport, but after the closing of the factory in 2006 manufacture was moved to Slovakia. The original flavours consisted of Strawberry, Blackcurrant, Orange and Banana. Over the years more exotic flavours such as Ice Cream, Cola, Rhubarb & Custard, and Blue Mint were introduced as limited edition flavours. New Chewits pack designs, formats and flavours were launched in 2009.

Currently Chewits core flavour range includes Strawberry, Blackcurrant, Fruit Salad, Ice Cream and Orange. Ice Cream Chewits, originally released in 1989, were re-introduced in 2009 following an online petition and demand expressed on Facebook and Bebo.

Chewits were first advertised on television in 1976. The original advertisements featured the ‘Monster Muncher’, a Godzilla-resembling mascot on the hunt for something chewy to eat. The first ad featuring the Muncher threatening New York was made by French Gold Abbott and created by John Clive and Ian Whapshot. The first ad was so successful the sequel was delayed. The ‘Monster Muncher’ chomps and tramples humorously local and well-known international landmarks such as Barrow-in-Furness Bus Depot, a London block of flats, London Bridge, the Taj Mahal, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and the Empire State Building. The ‘Monster Muncher’ could only be quelled by a pack of Chewits.

A spin-off computer game, The Muncher, was released for the ZX Spectrum in 1988.

The original adverts used claymation special effects, similar in style to those made famous in the movies of Ray Harryhausen. They also included a voiceover style reminiscent of a 1950s radio serial.

A subsequent advertisement, originally aired in 1995, plays on the over-the-top advertising style of the post-war era. To the tune of bright 50’s era orchestration, a salesy narrator exhorts viewers to try a variety of chewy consumer items in the essential guide to a chewier chew. The ad shows the ‘Monster Muncher’ sampling items such as Wellington boots, a rubber boat and a rubber plant in order to be ready for the chewiest of chews – Chewits.

In the late 1990s, Chewits experimented with ads showing multiple news casting dinosaur puppets. The catchphrase advice at the close of each ‘broadcast’ was to "do it before you chew it". This style of ads was relatively short-lived for Chewits.

With a change of advertising agencies, the puppets were replaced by colourful 2D animations. The ‘Monster Muncher’ was re-introduced as ‘Chewie’ in two popular adverts from this time. In the first, which aired in 2000, Chewie roller skates on two buses through a busy city scene. The second, which went out a year later in 2001, shows Chewie waterskiing at a popular seaside resort. The ads included a rendition of the 1994 hit song ‘I like to move it’ by Reel 2 Real, with the chorus, "I like to Chewit Chewit."

In 2003, after a further shift in advertising agencies, a new ad was aired showing a wide range of animals auditioning to be the new face of Chewits. The ad announced the return of the iconic dinosaur Chewie mascot, now dubbed ‘Chewie the Chewitsaurus’.

In 2009, Chewits introduced the new Chewie the Chewitsaurus look, showing a contemporary, computer-game-style slick design. Chewie the Chewitsaurus features on all Chewits packaging and sponsorship activity.

Fizzy Cola Bottles

Remember that fizzy, sour cola taste you used to get from these? I think these are another sweet you either love or hate. Real cola tasting Giant fizzy bottles.

Milk Bottles

These white milk bottle shaped chewy white sweets are also known as milk gums. They were pretty popular in the UK, and are still selling well today repackaged as retro sweets.

Pacers

These were a kind of Opal Fruits spin-off, but came in peppermint and spearmint flavours. They were discontinued sometime in the 80’s.

Sweet Bananas

These yummy sweet bananas, soft, juicy chews with a lovely mellow banana flavour.

Mackintosh’s Toffee

Mackintosh’s Toffee is a sweet created by John Mackintosh.

Mackintosh opened up his sweets shop in Halifax, Yorkshire, England in 1890, and the idea for Mackintosh’s Toffee, not too hard and not too soft, came soon after. In 1969, Mackintosh’s merged with rival Rowntree to form Rowntree Mackintosh, which merged with Nestle in 1988.

The product is often credited with being over 100 years old.

The toffee is sold in bags containing a random assortment of individual wrapped flavoured toffees. The flavours are (followed by wrapping colour): Malt (Blue), Harrogate (Yellow), Mint (Green), Egg & Cream (Orange), Coconut (Pink), Toffee (Red). The red wrapped toffees do not display a flavour on the wrapper. The product’s subtitle is "Toffee De Luxe" and its motto "a tradition worth sharing".

Space Dust

Space Dust the candy that pops when placed in your mouth.

Bazooka bubble gum

It was first marketed shortly after World War II in the U.S. by the Topps Company based in Brooklyn, New York. The gum was packaged in a patriotic red, white, and blue color scheme. Beginning in 1953, Topps changed the packaging to include small comic strips with the gum, featuring the character "Bazooka Joe". There are 50 different "Bazooka Joe" comic-strip wrappers to collect. The product has been virtually unchanged in over 50 years.

The Topps company expanded the flavors, making them Original, Strawberry Shake, Cherry Berry, Watermelon Whirl, and Grape Rage. The Strawberry flavor is packaged in a pink and white wrapper and the Grape in a purple and white wrapper. Bazooka gum can also be found in a sugar free variety with the standard bubble gum flavor and a "Flavor Blasts" variety, claimed to have longer lasting, more intense taste. Bazooka gum comes in 2 different sizes.

Bazooka bubblegum is sold in many countries, often with Bazooka Joe comic strips translated into the local language. Bazooka gum is sold in Canada with cartoons in both English and French, depending upon the city. In Israel, manufactured under license to Elite, the cartoons are written in Hebrew. The gum was also sold in Yugoslavia and later in Slovenia until the local licensee allowed their license to expire in 2006. The "Bazooka Joe" cartoons are about "Bazooka Joe" and his friends. There are also "Bazooka Joe" t-shirts in return for 15 Bazooka Joe comics and .99 while supplies last. But the offer has been discontinued.

In May 2009 it was announced that the Bazooka Joe comic was to be adapted into a Hollywood movie.

Traffic Light lollies

These were a red yellow and green lolly that was a childhood favourtite sweet for many.

Black Magic Chocolates

What a huge disappointment these chocolates are!! A few years ago Nestle made an almighty mistake by doing away with THE best brand of dark chocolates, favourites of many thousands of people, and replacing them with cardboard pretend chocolate squares which tasted cheap and nasty. Most boxes ended up in the bin. Last year I had a letter from Nestle saying they were bringing the classics back, fantastic, I was straight to the shop for some, so bad was my addiction, but horribly they are nothing like the originals.

The dont taste or smell the same, the centres are hard and taste of chemicals, like long gone off chocolates. The bottom line is this, why change them in the first place? and when you realised you had made a mistake why not bring back the originals instead of these tacky replacements. very sad, and I still havent found any chocs like Black Magic, I still have original boxes with ribbons from the 1950’s, now they were class.

Texan

Ultra-chewy, chocolate-covered nougat bar launched in the mid-70s; disappeared in the mid-80s.

Banjo

Boring two-fingered wafer bar, lasted for most of the 80s.

Callard & Bowser Creamline Toffees

A 2001 casualty; they were better than Toffos.

Amazin Raisin

1971-78 – the sweets equivalent of rum’n’raisin ice cream.

Freshen Up

Chewing gum with a liquid centre, an 80s innovation.

Bluebird Toffee

A classic, but a recent casualty of confectionery industry takeovers.

Jap Desserts

These old coconut sweets (coconut was often known as ‘Jap’) died a death in the early 2000s.

Counters (Galaxy)

Harmless chocolate beans cruelly cut off.

Pink Panther

Extraordinary strawberry-flavoured chocolate bars, thin like Milky Bars. An acquired taste.

Bandit

Wafer biscuit – a challenger to Penguins.

Club bars

From Jacobs. The full range has been withdrawn, but Orange is still available. Symbol guide: plain = jack of clubs; milk = golf ball; mint = green leaf. Bog-standard but likable for thick chocolate.

Nutty Pure

80s bar, with a smoky brown see-through wrapper. Peanuts encase a fudge-type caramel log centre.

Double Agent

Extremely artificial blackcurrant- or apple-flavoured boiled sweets, with a sherbet centre and spy questions on the wrapper. Classic cold war confectionery.

Mighty Imp’s

Mighty Imps were really old fashioned liquorice and menthol pellets that used to turn your tongue black… lovely!

They were sugar free and were marketed to help you keep a clear voice and protect against a sore throat (due to the menthol content I suspect).

Zoom

This ice lolly on a stick was shaped like a rocket and was made up of three sections, each with its own distinct flavour. In sequence this was lime, lemon and strawberry.

Refreshers

Fruit flavour fizzy sweets in a roll. Raspberry, lemon, lime and orange flavours. Refreshingly fizzly.

White Chocolate Mice

These white chocolate mice were cream flavoured and are silky smooth on your tongue. You certainly will not want the cat to get these sweet mice!!

The top 10 Best Sales – Through the ages

1966

1 Mars bar
2 Cadbury’s Dairy Milk
3 Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum
4 Milky Way
5 Polo
6 Kit Kat
7 Crunchie
8 Wrigley’s Arrowmint Gum
9 Rowntree’s Fruit Pastilles
10 Maltesers

1978

1 Mars bar
2 Kit Kat
3 Cadbury’s Dairy Milk
4 Twix
5 Yorkie
6 Milky Way
7 Bounty
8 Maltesers
9 Aero
10 Smarties

1988

1 Mars bar
2 Kit Kat
3 Marathon
4 Wispa
5 Polo
6 Extra Strong Mints
7 Fruit Pastilles
8 Flake
9 Rolo
10 Double Decker

1997

1 Kit Kat
2 Mars bar
3 Cadbury’s Dairy Milk
4 Roses
5 Twix
6 Wrigley’s Extra
7 Quality Street
8 Snickers
9 Maltesers
10 Galaxy

2004

1 Cadbury’s Dairy Milk
2 Wrigleys Extra
3 Maltesers
4 Galaxy
5 Mars bar
6 Kit Kat
7 Celebrations
8 Quality Street
9 Haribo (total sales)
10 Roses

Can anyone add to the list?

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Cool China Fixture Part Machining Makers photos

A few nice china fixture part machining manufacturers images I found:

WI – WR – Historical Bristol Street Directory 1871
china fixture part machining manufacturers
Image by brizzle born and bred
Mathews’ Bristol Street Directory 1871

Wilder Street, North Street to Grosvenor Road

John Smith, lath render
J. T. Ball and Sons, maltsters, etc
John Summerville, builder, etc
Charles Pitman
James Merry, black smith
John Tucker
Thomas Davis, chimney sweep

William Sherring, nail manufacturer William Nichols – In October 1884 he was 14 years old, living with his parents in Baptist Mills and working at Messrs W Sherring of Wilder Street, a nail manufactory. Whilst carrying iron from the bins he slipped and fell against the flywheel. By the time the machine was stopped, he was dead. There was a fence around the machine, but the workers were in the habit of ‘pushing it aside’.

Withy & Co. ginger-beer, lemonade & soda-water manufacturers
James Williams, 1, Cave street cottages
Eliza Snow, fly proprietor, 2, Cave street cottages
Joseph Johnson, carpenter & undertaker, 3, Cave street cottages
George Smith, boot maker
William Lambert, grocer, etc
Joseph Chard, baker & flour dealer
J. Andrews, chimney sweeper
Ann Winniatt, shopkeeper
Joshua Williams, builder
George Mico, grocer
Mary Weston, greengrocer
James Seamer, beer seller

Mrs William Paul, vict, Two Trees 1794. John Lewis / 1806. Isaac Phipps / 1816. Stephen Seager / 1820 – 22. J. Morrosson / 1823 – 32. Samuel Morrosson 1834 – 45. James Vickery / 1847 – 61. James Bale / 1863. Edwin Hamber / 1865 – 69. George Lambourne / 1871. Mrs. Paul 1872 – 75. George Wintle (jnr) / 1877 – 78. Sarah Sowden / 1879 to 1882. John Sharp / 1883. C. Tomkins.

George Howard, vict, Albion Tavern 1841 – 53. Elizabeth Morrison / 1858 – 66. Henry Couzens / 1867 to 1868. W. Watts / 1869. Francis Virtue / 1871. George Howard 1872 to 1875. S. Barton / 1876. T. C. Manning / 1877. S. Balderson / 1878. C. Wyman / 1879. Samuel Harris / 1882 – 83. William Tarr 1885 – 88. William Bailey / 1889. George Clohesey / 1891. Sarah Ann Knight / 1892. Rosina Pollard / 1896 – 99. Charles Spiller 1901. Edward Coles.

Charles King, vict, Royal Oak 1832 – 34. Henry Watkins / 1869. George King / 1871. Charles King / 1872 to 1874. Mabel King / 1875 – 83. Isabella King 1885. George Knott / 1886 – 1909. Frederick King / 1914 – 17. Ellen White / 1921 – 25. Angelina Reed.

James Newman, vict, Crown 1860. John Yeandel / 1866 – 82. James Newman / 1883 to 1887. Kate Morgan / 1888 to 1891. Kate Rowles / 1892. Thomas Dinan 1896 – 1901. George Jenkins.

James Nash, vict, Royal George 1860. Ann Mundy / 1863 – 72. James Naish / 1874 – 81. Joseph W. Keall / 1882 – 87. William Clements / 1889 – 1901. James Thatcher.

Notes

Harry Dimmock – Living at Wilder Street, he was buried at St Paul on January 19th 1839 aged 71.

Ann Roach – Aged 21 in November 1842, she was taken to the Infirmary as while she was crossing Wilder Street she was knocked down by a fly (cab) which passed over her leg and injured it severely.

Wildgoose Cottages, St Philip’s Marsh

Wilkin’s Cottages, Folly Lane

William Street, Grosvenor road to Ashley Road

1. Maria Fuller
2. William Barter
3. Samuel David White
4. Henry Critchett
5. George Hill
6. James Wilmot
7. Herbert Cousins
8. George Browning
9. Charles Williams
10. Henry Hobbert
11. John Edward Sollis
12. Henry Tom Moody
13. David Bank Edwards
14. William Henry Thomas
15. John Goodeve, tea dealer

Notes

G Drake – Lived at 31, King Square. On 2nd March 1899 wrote to the newspaper stating that John Drake carpenter convicted of theft at the assizes was no connection. He did have a son called John who was also a carpenter who resided at 25, William Street, St Pauls.

William Street, Dings

Samuel Isles, beer retailer (Off Licence)
Francis Evans, grocer

William Street, Pylle Hill, Totterdown

2. Edwin Nott, haulier
3. George and Henry Roe
74. Henry Haskins, baker, Victoria house

1. Gilbert Babbage, vict, King William Hotel 1868 – 69. Aaron Davy / 1871 – 83. Gilbert Babbage / 1885 – 88. Matilda Morse / 1889 – 91. Henrietta Thomas 1892 to 1896. John Southwood / 1897. Joseph Gair / 1899. H. Smith / 1904. Emily Newman / 1909. Joseph Gullock 1912 – 21. Florence Annie Geh / 1925 – 38. Frederick Grove.

Williams’ Court, off Barton Street

Richard Excell – Aged 46 in 1818, a shoemaker living with his wife in Williams’ Court, Barton Street, they, were receiving relief payments from St Peter’s Hospital.

Willway Street, Philip Street, Bedminster

Robert Lewis, grocer
William Morgan, mason

George Parker, vict, Willway Tavern 1871. George Parker / 1872 to 1886. Herman Tozer / 1887 – 89. Elizabeth Tozer / 1891 – 1906. Alfred Tozer 1909. William Saunders / 1914 – 21. Leonard Wyatt / 1925 – 31. Robert Wyatt.

Samuel Hardwick, vict, Eagle Tavern 1871 – 77. Samuel Hardwick / 1878. Eli Bowditch / 1881 – 82. William Fewings / 1883 – 91. William Hill / 1892. Joseph Wring 1896. Mary Jane Wring / 1899. Henry Nichols / 1901. William Bryant / 1904. M. Broomsgrove.

Jesse Bumbold, vict, Chequers Tavern Whitehouse Lane / Willway Street. 1865 – 87. Jesse Rumbold / 1888 – 99. Benjamin Rowse / 1901. Henry Pillinger / 1904 – 06. Mary Hampton / 1909. Henry Hampton 1914. William Bailey / 1917 – 21. Albert Evans / 1925 – 28. Nellie Catherine Foxwell / 1931. Gabriel Biggin 1934 – 38. William James Rowland.

Willway Street, Whipping Cat Hill to Lucky Lane

15. Thomas Chinnock, dairyman
Wethered, Cossham, and Wethered, coal merchants, Railway yard

16. J. Gazzard, grocer and beer retailer, vict, Beaufort Arms grocery, bakery and beer house. 1870 – 76. Joseph Gazzard / 1881 – 86. William Bowyer / 1888. H. Maynard / 1888 – 89. John H. Kennard / 1891. Charlotte Baker 1892. George Dunn / 1899. Elizabeth Gulley / 1901 – 06. Hannah Underdown / 1914. Harry Stubbins.

Wilmot’s Crescent, Rose Street, Great Gardens

Wilmot’s Vale, Pipe Lane, Temple

Wilson Avenue, Wilson Street to Cross Gardens

(Beaufort Cottages)

Mark Appleby
Charles W. Porter
John Woodward, carpenter and builder
Elizabeth Thomas

(Beaufort Place)

John Purnell
George Dowling, smith
Charles Cockle
James Bailey
Thomas Wright
Edwin Mutton, boot maker

Wilson Court, Wilson Street

Wilson Place, Wilson Street

John Gore, 1, Wilson villas
William Mortimer, 2, Wilson villas
John Edwards, Aldine cottage
M. Bendell, Gloster cottage
John Cockle
Joseph Baker
John Kirby
M. Fowler
William Thompson
John Southern
John Cudler, mason
Joseph Davis, painter

Wilson Street, Portland Square to Cross Gardens

1. Charles D. Hall, relieving ofiicer
2. George Higgs Masters
3. William Wills, (post office)
4. Mrs Parry
5. Angus Cameron, draper
6. Henry Jones, carpenter
7. Miss Louisa Roberts
8. James Perry, boot maker
9. Joseph Griffin
10. William Ackland
11. William Smith
12. Charles Allen
13. David Griffin
14. Amos Deacon
15. Edward Taplin
16. Thomas Jones
(Gideon Cottages Intersect)
13. James Burrell
14. George Winterson, mason
15. Charles Cuthbert
16. Daniel Chapple
17. James Larcombe, grocer & beer seller
18. Mrs Cox
19. John Routley, grocer & beer seller
(cross over)

St. Paul’s National School, Henry George Clevely, master, Miss Wood, mistress – see below

19. John Clark
20. Mary Smith
21. John Marsh, wood carver
22. Samuel Pullin
23. David Williams
24. John Wakley, mason
25. Thomas Wall
26. Jane Ash
27. Elizabeth Holder
28. James Kingcott, tailor and draper
29. Frank Webb
30. George Adlam, junr.
31. Charles Phillips
Robert Nicholls
32. John Evans
33. Priscilla Mainwaring
31. Malcombe Robertson, tailor, etc
35. Sidney Sprod
36. John Postance
37. R. S. Deacon
38. Nathaniel Davis

Wright and Butler, lamp manufacturers of Birmingham. 1875 exhibited petroleum heating stoves at the 1875 Smithfield Club Show. Oil lamps with the American-style circular ‘The Union Burner’. By 1913 they had been taken over by Falk Veritas of London but use of the Trade name continued.

Parochial Schools, Wilson Street, St Pauls In 1883 225 boys, 162 girls. In 1898 185 boys, 162 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: George Vernon (Teacher), Miss F Perry (Teacher) 1861 Mr Clevely (Teacher), Miss Roberts (Teacher) 1883.

Notes: In 1858 John Henry Trinder who had been a pupil teacher at the school was made a Queen’s Scholar, being entitled to 3 years’ education at one of Her Majesty’s Training Colleges free of charge. At the annual school treat in July 1861 400 children were present in the morning when they were examinaed in Scripture by Rev H Rogers, the incumbent and in grammar, gepgraphy and arithmetic by their respective teachers. In the evening there was a substantial tea in the school room which had been decorated with flowers and mottos. In the centre was suspended a white silk banner with a bridal rosette in the middle, as a token of regard of the incumbent’s daughter, Mary Anne Rogers, who had married Thomas Byard Winter Sheppard the previous week. The banner bore the words ‘God bless our pastor’s daughter – Happiness attend her’ in blue lettering.

George Vernon was Master for 18 years and in July 1868 he left to take up the Mastership of the Earl Ducies schools at Tortworth. Several of his past students started a collection and in the end there were 169 subscribers who gave a total of £25. He was presented with an English gold lever watch with guards and appendages and there was enough left over for a pair of vases for Mrs Vernon. At the presentation on July 20th he was also awarded an illuminated text. Edward William Clevely was the second son of George and Emma Clevely. He died aged 22 in October 1884. In July 1886 Ada Reilly Sims passed the examination for admittance to Red Maids.

Notes

Henry Flower – A groom in the service of Mr Tucker of Surrey Mews. He lived at 10, Wilson Street, St Pauls. In July 1885 he was riding a horse through Cumberland Street when the animal slipped and he sustained a compound fracture of the left leg.

Wilson Terrace, Wilson Street

1. Joseph Bridges
2-3. Harriett Thomas
4. George Case
5. William Blake, tailor
6. S. Barrett, painter, etc
7. Alfred Tucker
8. James Stokes

Windmill Hill, Whitehouse Lane

Edward Edgar, beer retailer
Edward Parsons, grocer
James Webber, boot maker, Clifton view cottage
Mrs Gummer, shopkeeper
Albert Stone,
Bethel Chapel (Congregational) founded 1855.
Windmill Hill Board School. Architect A R F Trew.

Sarah Annie Jones, vict, Rising Sun Alfred Road (Windmill Hill) 1853 – 63. William Old / 1871 – 72. Sarah Jones / 1874. William Cheeseman / 1875 to 1888. William Allen / 1889 – 92. John Crossman 1896 – 1917. William Haines / 1928 – 31. James Templar / 1933 – 50. William King / 1953. Walter Lippiatt.

William Bray, vict, Friendship Windmill Hill. 1871 – 1909. William Bray / 1914. Henry Bray / 1917 – 21. Maurice Gould / 1925. Rosina Gould / 1928 – 31. Rosina Parfitt 1935 – 38. Frederick Burchill / 1950 – 53. Frederick Thorne / 1960. R. C. Loveridge / 1975. D. W. Hooper.

Edwin Griffiths, vict, Saddler’s Arms 1871. Edwin Griffiths.

(Providence Place)

Ann Callow, grocer
George Merritt, butcher

Stephen Hopper Hemmings, vict, Spotted Horse Providence Place (Mill Lane) 1842 – 58. Henry Wakefield / 1860 – 69. Samuel Barber / 1871 – 72. Stephen Hopper Hemmings / 1874 – 78. William Davey 1879. George Parker / 1881 – 97. Isaac Gould / 1899. William Brayley / 1904 – 38. Alfred Giles / 1944 – 50. Albert May 1953. Ernest Edward May.

Henry Parker, vict, Colston’s Arms Providence Place, Mill Lane. 1775. Evan Williams / 1792. John Cox / 1837 – 40. James Parker / 1842 – 87. Henry Parker / 1888 – 1901. Charles R. Parker 1904. Frederick Bishop / 1904 to 1908. William Hamlyn / 1909 – 21. Thomas Horner / 1925 – 44. Edwin Nathaniel Watkins 1950 – 53. Frederick Prideaux.

Notes

John Cox (d. January 1899) Aged 43 of Alfred Road, Windmill Hill, found dead in bed. Inquest revealed he suffered pains in his chest. Verdict cardiac failure.

John Howell (d. February 1872) He was 46 when he was found dead in a limekiln on Windmill Hill. His wife Eliza, who had been separated from him for 5 years said he had formerly been a cooper, but due to drink he had had a paralytic seizure and had been put in the workhouse.. He had however left the day before and slept in the kiln where he was found dead by George Rogers a limeburner, on arriving for work.

Windmill Hill Terrace, Windmill Hill

New Mission, Windmill Hill This was opened in August 1884. Rev Canon Mather speaking at the ceremony said many years ago he had unsuccessfully tried to get a church built in the area and was glad to see that there was now a mission rooms. It was beautiful, inexpensive but in want of so many things, not even a harmonium as the one that was there that day had been lent to them. The room was capable of holding 230 people, being 45′ 6" by 20′ 6" with a gallery at one end and a movable platform at the other. On top of the building was a gilded weathervane representing a windmill. A design for a church had been approved at that time, but money was required to carry out the building of it.

Windsor Court, Blackfriars, Lewin’s Mead

Blackfriars Board School, Maudlin Street. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: J Whippey (Master), Miss Sophia Vigor (Mistress) 1883-1865 Miss Mitchell (Mistress) 1898.

Moravian Day, Sunday and Infant Schools, Blackfriars and Maudlin Street. In 1872 for 100 boys and 100 girls. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Mr Stockman (Master, Miss Vigor (Mistress) 1872.

Windsor Court, Temple Street

Windsor Court, Kingsland Road

Windsor Terrace, Whitehouse Lane

William H. Gregory, chemist
Thomas Webb, greengrocer
Samuel Hignell, grocer, etc

John Perrett, vict, Forester’s Arms Whitehouse Lane. 1871. James Perrett / 1872. John Perrett / 1874 – 77. James Crof / 1879 – 89. Wellington Beaven / 1891 – 1917. William Evans 1921 – 35. Arthur Evans / 1936 – 1937. Caroline Evans / 1937. Grace Johnson / 1944 – 53. Caroline Sutor.

Notes

Henry Dalton – In February 1872 he was 35 years old, a labourer of 28, Windsor Terrace, Bedminster. He had been unloading bags of sugar from the ship Zanzibar, when he stumbled and fell about 20 feet into the hold and died on the spot. An inquest was held.

Windsor Terrace, Granby Hill, near Paragon, Clifton

1. Joseph Tinn
2. Mrs McGeachey
3. Michael Castle
4. Rev. Walter J. Whiting
5. Isaac Allan Cooke
7. Henry Tayler
10. Miss P. Usher
Herbert De Winton, Windsor villa
William F. Fox, 1, Windsor place
Arthur Carter, 2, Windsor place

Windsor Terrace, St Paul’s

1. William Garrard
2. Robert Couch
3. Samuel James Toleman
4. Mary Matthews
5. Thomas Austin
6. Noah Browning
7. Charles Wathen
8. Sarah Harding
9. William Besley (police)

Windsor Terrace, Totterdown

Mark Thomas
George Richardson, shipping agent
W. Bucknell
Thomas Powell
Felix Raistrick
Charles Thomas, builder
Robert Goddard
John Wallbridge
William Paul, mason
Charles Woodman, cooper
J. L. Vincent, pianoforte tuner

Windsor Terrace, Woolcott Park

Henry Long
Benjamin Vowles
James Heard
J. R. Freeman
Charles Blackburn
Herr Voit, professor of music
George Vinney
Miss Chapple
George Towning
H. R. Wheeler
James Chard, British schoolmaster
Alfred R. Watson, professor of music
H. Evans
W. French, grocer & provision factor

Notes

George Wolfe 1834-1890 Born in Bristol, adopted in early life by a Mrs Buckley of Windsor Terrace, Clifton. Painted marine views and landscapes, oil and watercolour. On his marriage went to live in Hampshire.

Wine Street, Corn Street to Narrow Wine Street

1. Mary Bell, fishmonger & fruiterer
J. W. Trew, surveyor
F. Powell, lithographer
2-3. William and Alfred Edwards, hosiers, glovers, etc
4. Samuel Miller, stationer, fancy depot
5. George Nattriss, confectioner
6. Cotterell Brothers, paper-hangings manufacturers
7-8. O’Handlen & Co., umbrella & fishing tackle manufacturers
9. Samuel J. Burman, watch maker, etc
10. Charles M’Millan, tailor and draper
11-13. A. T. Maishman, milliner and fur manufacturer
14. Baker & Burt, ladies’ outfitters, etc
15-16. Charles and Son, tailors
17. Ridler, Coulman, & Co. Manchester warehousemen, etc
18. Joseph Vincent, brush & comb maker
19. G. Edwards and Son, outfitters
20. John Catlin, brush and comb maker
21. Edward John, hat maker
21. O. Ransford, wholesale hat maker
22. James Candy & Son, linen warehouse
23. John Stroud, chemist
24-26. John W. Langdon & Co. woollen merchants
27-28. Gray & Co., milliners, etc
29. J. Barker, glass and china warehouse
30. William Pockson & Son, fringe and fancy warehouse
31. Maurice Michael, watchmaker and pawnbroker
32. Wills, Biggs and Williams, general warehousemen
33-35. S. Weston, milliner and mantle warehouseman
36. Thomas Bale, watchmaker, etc
37. Martin Wintle, silk mercer, etc
38. Henry Peart, straw warehouse
39. Hillyer & Trew, hosiers & lacemen
40. Thomas Thompson, hosier & laceman
41. Henry Jacob Allis, watch maker
42. David Hyam, outfitter
43. Sharp and Granger, linen drapers
44. Todd and Co. outfitters
45-47. Snow and Taylor, linen drapers, silk mercers, etc
48. Coombs & Co. woollen drapers
49. J. Lodge & Co. bonnet, fur, and mantle warehouse
50-54. Baker, Baker, & Co. warehousemen, drapers, etc
55. Richard Taylor, linen draper, etc
56-60. Jones & Co. linen drapers, etc
61-62. D. P. Belfield & Son, toy & fancy goods warehouse
63-64. J. A. Hodgson, hosier and outfitter
65. J. Baker, hosier and shirt maker
66. Maurice Moore, tobacconist and foreign money exchange
67. Thomas W. Tilly, hat & umbrella maker & fancy bag dealer

Adam and Eve, Wine Street (also listed as Wine Street Passage) For sale on 19th January 1860 as in the possession of George Knowland under lease for 14 years from 14th September 1857, rent £105. Freehold and free. Listed in Inn and Commercial Tavern section.

Information on landlords: F Probart 1824 Edwin Ward 1836-40 George Knowland 1852 G Knowland 1867 George Frederick Knowland 1878 Elizabeth Knowland 1882. Notes: Richard Trotman described as ‘late landlord’ died aged 46 at Coronation Road on March 20th 1840.

Notes: Mr Knowland had a disagreement with T Jones of Jones & Co when the firm’s new store was being erected in Wine Street owing to a part of a cellar used by Mr Knowland being purchased by Mr Jones during the construction. This boiled over on 1st May 1855. Mr Jones had been celebrating a win in Chancery with a group of friends at the house of Mr McMillan, consuming half a dozen bottles of champagne between them which they decided would benefit froma a brandy and water chaser. So they went to the Adam and Eve, whereupon Mr Knowland burst out, grabbed Mr Jones by the collar, pushed him against a wall and swore that he would not enter. After asking him by letter to apologise and send an amount to the Bristol Infirmary, to which there was no reply, Mr Jones brought a case against Mr Knowland that was heard at the Tolzey Court in July. After hearing the evidence the Recorder stated that it would be better settled out of court, which was done.

In 1856 John Baker was charged at Bristol Police Court with stealing three coats from the tavern, the property of Mr Knowland, the landlord. Baker, a recruit, to whom Mr Knowland was said to have shown great kindness, was said to have confessed his guilt and to be very contrite and on the landlord.s intercession the charge was dropped and Baker handed over to his sergeant.

In January 1870 it was reported that for many years Mr Knowland had placed on the smoking tables each Saturday a box in aid of the Royal Infirmary and General Hospital, He had regularly, until recently before his health failed, shaken the box before each customer in the 2 rooms with a friendly request for a penny. The collection for 1861 amounted to 25 guineas, in 1869 was £25 4s.

Mr Knowland was also a visitor at St Peter’s Hospital and Robert James ‘a big powerful man’ who had been an inmate and knew him from this work was taken to court on 1868 for threatening him when he would not offer employment. In 1883 Mrs Knowland reported the collection boxes holding £2 12s 8d.

In March 1884 Albert O’ Brien and Albert Richards were charged with having stolen a pint measure from the pub. It was noticed by a policeman that the measure was marked with ‘Knowland, Adam and Eve’ on the side. O’Brien said that he had ordered the beer just before closing time and could not finish it all so he had taken the cup away and was going to return it the next week. They were fined 11s without costs.

Notes

George Beard – In October 1892 was charged along with his elder brother George, with stealing dress material and other goods from Messrs Jones in Wine Street. George had been employed by the firm as a porter for 2 years. A shop assistant, Helen Anstey stated that she had cut a length of dress material and put it aside and when she returned it was missing. At 6pm George asked her for paper to wrap a parcel and when she followed him the cloth was found there. He pleaded guilty and when he was accompanied to 2, Orchard Street, the Batch, where he lived other pieces of material were found there. His brother lived in 54, Goodhind Street , where more material was found.

Eliza Emily Cottrell, of Wine Street. Declared bankrupt 2nd June 1868.

Joseph Dyer – A lodging house keeper of Wine Street, inserted a notice in the newspaper, February 1818, expressing thanks to the Governor, Deputy Governor and Guardians of the Poor for not prosecuting him ‘for suffering Margaret Thomas, a single woman to lye in at my house of a Bastard Child, thus bringing a charge upon the parish of St Peter’.

Widow Foord – In 1757 was a glover. Lived near the Corn Market in Wine Street.

Catherine Forster (d. 18th January 1805) Eldest daughter of Mr Joseph Forster formerly an apothecary in Wine Street. Died in her 30th year of a consumption ‘as did her two sisters, a few years past.’ according to obituary notice.

Ralph Oliff – Landlord of the Three Tuns In Wine Street. Was sheriff in 1664 and mayor in 1673 and it is claimed he said he took office ‘solely to persecute the Nonconformists.’ Died aged 64 and was buried in the chancel of All Saints.

Mrs Oxley – In 1827 she and three of her children perished in a fire in Wine Street.

Philip Scapulis (d. 1590) Originally from Trier, a stationer lived in Wine Street. In 1577 he was involved (with others) in a dispute with the Attorney General regarding whether their houses which had previously belonged to the Merchant Tailors’ Guild were therefore property of the Crown It was decided by jury that this was not the case. Wife Elizabeth, daughter Margaret, who was born in 1581 and died 4 years later. It is unlikely that he had any other children as they are not mentioned in his will which left bequests to cousins and godsons, neighbours and an ex-apprentice Richard Foorde.

Businesses Wine Street

The Don, 45 and 46 Wine Street (Clothing) The Bristol branch of the Don opened in 1883 under Manager W H Forsyth, who presided over a staff of 30. was one of many in towns throughout England. The upper floor housed workrooms, where at the end of the 19th century sewing machines were ‘driven by an engine, also acting as the motor for the dynamo forming the generator for the electric light installation.’ The height of technology in the high street.

While bespoke tailoring was carried on using these sewing machines, the ready to wear items were made at Stroud. This enabled them to charge the customer only one shilling per ready-made item over the cost price. The handsome premises were destroyed during the Second World War, although the company carried on. Moving to the top of Park Street, particularly noted in the later years as recommended suppliers of school uniforms.

Parnall & Sons, Narrow Wine Street Parnall’s – much more than shop fitters, although this advertisement was specifically aimed at the grocery trade.

H G Parnall founded the business in 1820 and in 1893 it was being described as ‘immense’, having become a limited company some four years earlier. As well as the main warehouse and showroom in Narrow Wine Street, the company had an iron and brass foundry at Rosemary Street and a steam joinery at Fairfax Street. Scales and weighing machines (including the Patent National Balances invented by Mr Parnall and 20,000 sold between 1883 and 1893) were manufactured at Fishponds. The Patent Agate Hand Scales were described as ‘specially worthy of the attention of tea dealers……when suspended above the counter they will work three times as long as any other scale without getting out of order’.

The wide range of items manufactured and supplied also included weighbridges (suitable for railway companies, collieries and public corporations), scoops, sack lifters, barrows and trucks, canisters (in large variety), counter boxes and window show trays, show glasses, butchers’ and other warranted cutlery, marble top tables (for restaurants etc), show stands, treacle cisterns, safes and cash boxes, patent tills, provision tickets, window name plates, tobacco cutters and tobacconists’ fixtures, chairs, bottling machines hand carts, coffee mills, tea mixers, hoists, lifts and gas engines.

They employed 10 representatives on the road and 400 workmen.

Winscombe Buildings, Frogmore Street

Winscombe Court. Frogmore Street

Winsford Street, Pennywell Road, Stapleton Road

Joseph Thorley, painter, etc
Thomas Curtis, tailor, etc
Mary Gapper, greengrocer, etc
James H. Cole, grocer & tea dealer
George Woolley
Mrs Mary Young
Charles Turner, mariner
Charles Shapland
Thomas Rutley, shoe maker
Joseph Snell, tanner, etc
Alfred Johnson, mechanic
William Rowe
Fitzroy Robert Colborne, painter and glazier
John Jennings, baker
Simeon Millman, tea dealer

Mary Jenkins,vict, Pine Apple Pennywell Road. In 1881 Mary Jenkins described herself as ‘publican – out of business’. 1853. Robert Fewing / 1854. Mary Fewing / 1861 – 66. James Webber / 1867 – 79. Mary Jenkins / 1883 – 1904. William Whitaker 1909 – 21. Charles Tristram / 1925 – 38. Henry Castle / 1944 – 53. Edith Holbrook (James Webber was a publican, and potato dealer).

Winsley Villas, Coburg Road, Montpelier

Woburn Place, near Grenville Place, Hotwells

Woodbury Place, Black Boy Hill

Woodbury Terrace, Blackboy Hill

Woodland Road, Tyndall‘s Park to Cotham Road

Miss Butt, Bannerleigh house
James Proctor, Moreton house
Robert H. Symes, Carlton house
Capt. Charles Mallard, R.N. Dundonald house
Thomas N. Harwood
Augustus Phillips, Lansdown house
J. S. Marchant, Somerville house
William Sturge, Chilliswood house
John Hill Morgan, Parklands house
Alfred Gardiner, Dale villa

Iron Church In the fashionable suburb of Clifton, amid the large villas, a mission church was built of iron in 1865. Plans were drawn up for a permanent church by the celebrated architect James Piers St Aubyn, his only church in Bristol, and building was slow, 1870-81. His planned steeple, similar in appearance to that built at Christ Church, never rose above the basement stage and serves as a rather enormous NW porch.

Concerns about the stability of the building brought in John Bevan and he rebuilt part of the nave and chancel, completed 1909. It survived in use until 1976 when the parish was joined to St Saviour. The joint parish purchased the redundant Highbury Chapel c1975 which in turn was restored and rededicated to St Saviour & St Mary, Cotham to replace both buildings. The BBC purchased the Tyndall’s Park church for use as a scenery store. The interior was subdivided and a new entrance created in the north aisle. The church was acquired in the mid-1990s by a free-church congregation, and now in use as the Woodlands Christian Centre. Work began in July 2000 to convert the upper floor into supported housing and the ground floor is to be retained for worship.

Houses

Abergeldie, Woodland Road, Clifton No 19 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Bannerleigh, Woodland Road, Clifton No 15 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Carlton House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 11 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Dundonald House, Woodland Road, Clifton No 9 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Gordon Lodge, Woodland Road, Clifton No 17 in road. left hand side going towards Park Row.

Woodland Terrace, Hampton Road to Auburn Road

1. David Clarke Lindsey
2. Miss Eliza Peters
3. M. A. H. Wood
5. Caroline Ridgway
6. Edward Joseph Heyre

Woodwell Cottages, White Hart Lane

Woodwell Crescent, Jacob’s Wells

Woolcott Buildings, Lower Redland Road to Clyde Road

1. William Pincott
2. John Guppy
3. Benjamin Hall, grocer
4. Mrs Boxwell
5. Thomas Gammon
6. George Morgan, dairyman
7. George Parsons
8. James Carp
9. Walter Mizen, junior
10. Walter Mizen, senior
11. John Shorland, carpenter
12. Maurice Taylor, carpenter and stationer
13. Jeremiah Wicks
14. John Henson, boot maker
15. John Bool
16. William John Woodman
17. Enos Boulter
18. ?. Fear
19. John Knight
20. Enoch Ford
21. Isaac House, greengrocer & fruiterer, Fairfield cottage
22. Thomas Roberts, dairyman
23. T. Roberts, teacher of the piano, etc
24. Mrs Ann Ricketts
Miss Catherine Downs, dressmaker
William Johns
John Smith

Thomas Skyrme, vict, Shakespeare Tavern Lower Redland Road 1867 – 75. Thomas Skyrme / 1876 – 83. Emma Skyrme / 1885 – 92. Jane Marie Tavener / 1894 – 1928. Jane Marie Row 1931 – 35. John Pullen / 1937 – 50. William Hardwell / 1953. Lily Rose / 1975. A. T. H. Bryant Jane Marie Tavener/Rowe was the niece of Thomas and Emma Skyrme.

Woolcott Park, Clyde Road to Lover’s Walk

Uriah Mullett, dairyman & haulier
William Knowles, Rhosven lodge
Albert Gribble, Wynn house
Robert Acton Dodds, Gordon house
?. Stockwell house
Capt. Thomas W. Hives, Marlbro’ villa
George Gatchell, Carrville villa
Mrs Frankland Evelyn villa
W. B. Morgan, Brockley villa
Mrs Mary Harris, Merton villa
Mrs Hannah Hall, Eversley house
Alfred Albert Holmes, Northcote house
Arthur G. Heaven, Lyndhurst villa
Mrs Francis Gatchell, Sunnyside villa
Alfred P. Menefy, Dunmore villa
Mrs John Dix, Penmaen villa
Mrs Mary Ann Williams, Kingmead villa
Christopher Pocklington, Didsbury villa
William Arthur Leonard, Woolbury villa
John Clarke Wallop, Innisville villa
Miss C. Dickenson, Sidney lodge
George Young Home, Roseville villa
James Bailey, Sidney house
Mrs Edmond Gill, Old Cleve house
?. Rock house
Edwin Tardrew, Newlands villa
Henry Wansborough, Bewdley villa
?. Ahorn house
James Buck, Brookville lodge
Jesse Harris, Clarefont house
Eliza Knowles, Myrtle lodge
Dennis Fairchild, Melrose villa
Miss Chard, Gouldnappe house
?. Fripp, Carr villa

St Saviour’s Infant School, Woolcott Park. In 1898 for 100 children. Some members of staff as listed in directories, etc: Misss A Coombe (Mistress) 1898.

Charles Seaman – Living at 6. Leigh Villas, Woolcott Park when prosecuted by Bristol School Board in January 1875 for not sending children to school and fined 3 shillings.

Woolcott Park Terrace, Woolcott Park

George Henry Pike, Gifford lodge
Mrs Isabella Butler, Wilton villa
Christopher Waltham Porter
Miss Morgan, ladies’ school

Worcester Crescent, College Road (South)

Woodforde Ffookes
Joseph B. Powell
Admlral James Vashon Baker
Graham Campbell
Mrs Radcliffe
Montagu Gilbert Blackburn
Miss Elizabeth Salmon

Worcester Lawn, College Road (South)

Joseph L. Roeckel, professor of music
Rev. Beedam Charlesworth
Mrs Christian C. Jones
Dr. George Thompson

Worcester Terrace, Clifton Park

Frederick William Badock, Badminton house
Misses Haycock
Henry Pritchard
Charles Stewart Clarke
Rev. Nicholas Pocock
Rev. F. Vaughan Mather
William Edward Fox
Lady Molyneaux
Arthur Montague
Mrs Catherine Span
Robert Dow Ker
Rev. Philip Ashby Phalps
Gwinnett Tyler

Sshools Clifton Park

Anna Maria Notley & Louisa Nascele Harris, school, Worcester House, Worcester Terrace.

Miss Bartlett’s School for Young Ladies, Badminton House, Clifton park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

Clifton High School for Girls, Clifton Park, Clifton.

A R Douglas’ School for Young Gentlemen, Colchester House, Clifton Park, Clifton. Listed 1898.

Worcester Villas, College Road (South)

Francis Black, M.D. Worcester lodge
William Killegrew Wait
George Wills
Major Owen, Barham lodge
Swinfen Jordan, Cherith lodge

Wordsworth Terrace, Woolcott Park

World’s End, White Hart Steps, Jacob’s Wells

Worrall’s Road, Caroline Row, Durdham Down

Wright’s Court, Pipe Lane, Temple Street

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Injection molding lets the makers to get via the method of manufacturing

Injection molding lets the makers to get through the method of manufacturing

On those days, products are manufactured mainly by the manual method, even though machines are adopted for the fabrication, its share in the approach is very much less, and hence it gets fewer concentrations from workers sides. In the manufacturing procedure, always there necessitates for the presence of the preciseness, otherwise objects would get other forms. Further, the manufacturing procedure requires the danger of shedding in neighboring areas and hence often there prevails the unsafe surrounding to the functioning personnel. Becoming taken care of all these aspects, the professionals of the manufacturing technology have revealed the method of injection molding in the mechanized field. The process of which is now at present spread to the parts of the globe for handling of all concerns of the fabrication as it get the name for the larger precision.

Injection molding is the process that plays a essential function in the field of the generation of the injection molds. It has ability to craft the things in copious numbers ranging from thousand to the millions of the numbers and the most fascinating element is that the items that come from the machine will appear alike in all traits from shape to the dimension like the high quality. When it come the place for the injection molding, people could in a position to go through the mixture of the injection processes such as fast injection mold, plastic mold and plastic injection mold. Apart from, customer oriented injection molding procedure are also accessible in order to govern the orders of the men and women and their models.

The most imperative role of the method has played by the injection molds which is stated to be the device of the metal for casting and also it assists for the quicker and significantly less expensive process in a much more reputable manner. For its designing, lot of the procedures adopted, even of the laptop designing application of CAD and CAM have taken the role in the designing before the letting into the machine. Injection molds are produced of the aluminum in most situations.

All our daily life requirements are fulfilled by the factors that are manufactured right after following the principle of the injection molding. They found their hands in fields of automotives, electrical and electronics, IT, healthcare and in other associated and non-related fields. Even some parts of the computers and plastic cookware and other plastic include themselves in the list. Apart from of the plastic, some of the supplies of the thermoplastic nature are also integrated for the method because it hold the qualities getting expanded with the pressure and fits perfectly into the mold. It is very effectively becoming understood by the populaces, if the examples are provided and the most apt instance for the plastic injection molding strategy which is practically nothing but a single of the types that employ the plastic as the raw material is the crafting of the cell phones.

Plastic molds get the location on behalf of the affordability of the price that offered for the item. The producers give the choice for choice of the colors for the product to be manufactured. Further they have also presented the choice for getting choosing the resins for pouring. In addition to that, all post-injection procedure are becoming into their hands for creating the customers to get relief from all worries. Guarantee along with the modifications help adds to the approach by the manufactures.

For much more information on Injection Mold , please follow this site http://www.icomold.com/.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Cool Chinese Prototype Makers images

Check out these chinese prototype makers photos:

Maker Art: Preparing our very first classes
chinese prototype makers
Image by fabola
To prepare for the new maker art courses we will be teaching this semester, Geo Monley invited us to his fabulous maker space at Tam Higher on Martin Luther King Day. Our art maker group incorporated Jean, Natalina, Cynthia, Howard and Mark, my art maker friends from ‘Pataphysical Studios.

It was a really fun and productive session, and we got a lot completed together. We assembled more than 40 cardboard boxes, which students will use to construct a Chinese New Year Wonderbox. We fabricated tiny animal figures with a laser cutter. We developed our 1st prototypes with these cut-out wood figures, to discover diverse ways to make the animals move with hobby motors. Last but not least, we helped organize the maker space, sort parts and tools.

A lot more importantly, this was a great way to grow neighborhood about what could turn into our first public maker space in Mill Valley, if all goes effectively with our initial maker courses. Geo and I program to teach an right after-hours maker course for middle-college youngsters this spring: students will generate a city of the future collectively, making their personal buildings with wonderboxes. We’re off to a fantastic begin currently. Thank you, everybody!

Find out much more about the Wonderbox system: bit.ly/wonderbox-overview

Learn far more about my initial art maker course at the Lycée Français in Sausalito, exactly where we are now producing Chinese New Year wonderboxes: bit.ly/maker-art-sausalito-2016

Find out much more about our upcoming maker course at Tam High in Mill Valley, where we will create the City of the Future in April and Could 2016: bit.ly/maker-course-tam-high-spring-2016

Understand far more about Tam High technical courses&lta href=&quothttp://www.marinlearn.com/index.cfm?strategy=ClassListing.ClassListingDisplay&ampint_category_id=1&ampint_sub_category_id=28

View more maker art photos in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/photos/fabola/albums/72157663074065150

View much more Tam High pictures in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/photos/fabola/albums/72157660433218276

Maker Art: Preparing our first classes
chinese prototype makers
Image by fabola
To prepare for the new maker art courses we will be teaching this semester, Geo Monley invited us to his fabulous maker space at Tam High on Martin Luther King Day. Our art maker team integrated Jean, Natalina, Cynthia, Howard and Mark, my art maker close friends from ‘Pataphysical Studios.

It was a truly exciting and productive session, and we got a lot done collectively. We assembled over 40 cardboard boxes, which students will use to construct a Chinese New Year Wonderbox. We fabricated small animal figures with a laser cutter. We produced our 1st prototypes with these cut-out wood figures, to explore different ways to make the animals move with hobby motors. Last but not least, we helped organize the maker space, sort components and tools.

Much more importantly, this was a great way to grow neighborhood about what could become our first public maker space in Mill Valley, if all goes effectively with our very first maker courses. Geo and I program to teach an following-hours maker course for middle-college kids this spring: students will generate a city of the future with each other, making their own buildings with wonderboxes. We’re off to a fantastic start off already. Thank you, everyone!

Understand much more about the Wonderbox program: bit.ly/wonderbox-overview

Find out far more about my very first art maker course at the Lycée Français in Sausalito, where we are now producing Chinese New Year wonderboxes: bit.ly/maker-art-sausalito-2016

Discover far more about our upcoming maker course at Tam High in Mill Valley, where we will produce the City of the Future in April and May possibly 2016: bit.ly/maker-course-tam-high-spring-2016

Understand far more about Tam High technical courses&lta href=&quothttp://www.marinlearn.com/index.cfm?strategy=ClassListing.ClassListingDisplay&ampint_category_id=1&ampint_sub_category_id=28

View much more maker art photos in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/photos/fabola/albums/72157663074065150

View a lot more Tam Higher photographs in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/images/fabola/albums/72157660433218276

Maker Art: Preparing our first classes
chinese prototype makers
Image by fabola
To prepare for the new maker art courses we will be teaching this semester, Geo Monley invited us to his fabulous maker space at Tam Higher on Martin Luther King Day. Our art maker team included Jean, Natalina, Cynthia, Howard and Mark, my art maker pals from ‘Pataphysical Studios.

It was a truly enjoyable and productive session, and we got a lot done with each other. We assembled over 40 cardboard boxes, which students will use to develop a Chinese New Year Wonderbox. We fabricated small animal figures with a laser cutter. We created our initial prototypes with these cut-out wood figures, to discover diverse methods to make the animals move with hobby motors. Last but not least, we helped organize the maker space, sort parts and tools.

A lot more importantly, this was a wonderful way to develop community about what could turn out to be our first public maker space in Mill Valley, if all goes properly with our first maker courses. Geo and I program to teach an after-hours maker course for middle-school kids this spring: students will produce a city of the future together, generating their own buildings with wonderboxes. We’re off to a wonderful start currently. Thank you, everyone!

Discover more about the Wonderbox program: bit.ly/wonderbox-overview

Find out more about my very first art maker course at the Lycée Français in Sausalito, exactly where we are now generating Chinese New Year wonderboxes: bit.ly/maker-art-sausalito-2016

Discover a lot more about our upcoming maker course at Tam High in Mill Valley, exactly where we will produce the City of the Future in April and May possibly 2016: bit.ly/maker-course-tam-higher-spring-2016

Understand far more about Tam High technical courses&lta href=&quothttp://www.marinlearn.com/index.cfm?approach=ClassListing.ClassListingDisplay&ampint_category_id=1&ampint_sub_category_id=28

View much more maker art photographs in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/pictures/fabola/albums/72157663074065150

View far more Tam High images in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/photos/fabola/albums/72157660433218276

(Post from China rapid prototyping manufacturer blog)

Pataphysical Art Makers

A handful of good chinese prototype makers photos I found:

Pataphysical Art Makers
chinese prototype makers
Image by fabola
A productive afternoon making art together at Pataphysical Studios.

Medical doctors Canard and Rindbrain completed an illuminated painting that is constantly altering, as the light box about it cycles by way of the colors of the rainbow. This creates an ethereal expertise, as the brush strokes quietly shimmer and transform, to the sound of Brian Eno’s Music for Airports (see video: vimeo.com/151282015 ). Nicely completed, doctors!

Our guests this week had been Michael Easton and his son Kyan, who seemed to appreciate themselves. A pal of Dr. Figurine’s, Michael is fairly an achieved artist, inventor and engineer and showed us some of his cool creations, such as magical mushroom lights inspired by this video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5LjGFkpApw

Medical professional Fabio showed a Chinese New Year wonderbox prototype he is building for his upcoming maker workshops (bit.ly/wonderbox-overview ). Doctors Genuinely and Igor worked on bringing sound to more wonderboxes. Dr. Rindbrain showed his new Universe cards about Mamie. Dr. Figurine worked on a Neopixel badge for her lab coat. Physician Zboon showed some of his new pataphysical talismans. A fine time was had by all.

View much more ‘Pataphysical images: www.flickr.com/images/fabola/albums/72157623637793277

Watch ‘Pataphysical videos: vimeo.com/album/3051039

Discover more about Pataphysical Studios: pataphysics.us/

Maker Art: Preparing our initial classes
chinese prototype makers
Image by fabola
To prepare for the new maker art courses we will be teaching this semester, Geo Monley invited us to his fabulous maker space at Tam Higher on Martin Luther King Day. Our art maker group included Jean, Natalina, Cynthia, Howard and Mark, my art maker buddies from ‘Pataphysical Studios.

It was a genuinely entertaining and productive session, and we got a lot accomplished together. We assembled more than 40 cardboard boxes, which students will use to construct a Chinese New Year Wonderbox. We fabricated tiny animal figures with a laser cutter. We designed our first prototypes with these cut-out wood figures, to explore diverse techniques to make the animals move with hobby motors. Final but not least, we helped organize the maker space, sort parts and tools.

A lot more importantly, this was a fantastic way to grow neighborhood about what could turn out to be our very first public maker space in Mill Valley, if all goes effectively with our 1st maker courses. Geo and I program to teach an following-hours maker course for middle-school youngsters this spring: students will create a city of the future collectively, making their personal buildings with wonderboxes. We’re off to a fantastic start off currently. Thank you, everyone!

Discover a lot more about the Wonderbox system: bit.ly/wonderbox-overview

Find out a lot more about my very first art maker course at the Lycée Français in Sausalito, where we are now making Chinese New Year wonderboxes: bit.ly/maker-art-sausalito-2016

Discover a lot more about our upcoming maker course at Tam High in Mill Valley, where we will create the City of the Future in April and Could 2016: bit.ly/maker-course-tam-higher-spring-2016

Find out more about Tam High technical courses&lta href=&quothttp://www.marinlearn.com/index.cfm?approach=ClassListing.ClassListingDisplay&ampint_category_id=1&ampint_sub_category_id=28

View much more maker art photos in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/pictures/fabola/albums/72157663074065150

View much more Tam Higher pictures in this Flickr album: www.flickr.com/images/fabola/albums/72157660433218276

(Post from China rapid prototyping manufacturer blog)

3D metal makers

3D metal makers
The organization delivers engineering and style consulting, additive metal rapid prototyping and additive production services. It&#39s also in the midst of creating a Centre of Excellence for … The machine melts and sinters powdered metals, such as …
Study much more on PLANT

3D-Printed Injection Mold Inserts Permit More rapidly, Less costly Style and Prototyping
Going a step further, German moldmaker Hasco not too long ago created a rapid approach of producing injection mold tooling inserts by integrating Stratasys&#39 3D printing technologies with its K3500 fast-adjust mold system. The purpose is to permit injection molders …
Read much more on DesignNews

Social Media Takes the NYPD from Talking to Listening
… systems go beyond mechanized workflows to introduce empowered workers, versatile collaboration, and speedy iteration. Such behaviors also characterize open supply computer software development and are at the heart of DevOps culture, processes, and tooling.
Study far more on SYS-CON Media (press release)

US Wine Packaging Industry
Technical corks, such as micro-agglomerated and twin disk varieties, account for the majority of cork demand and will record far more rapid gains than full natural corks. Technical corks are priced competitively with synthetic corks, supply several of the …
Read a lot more on SYS-CON Media (press release)

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)