Monthly Archives: August 2017

Most popular China 3d Printen Prototype Manufacturers auctions

China 3d Printen Prototype Manufacturers on eBay:

(Post from China rapid prototyping manufacturer blog)

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MOBO TOYS

A few nice mobo furniture images I found:

MOBO TOYS
mobo furniture
Image by EVERYMAN FILMS
MOBO TOYS’ were made by D. SEBEL & CO., ERITH, KENT, ENGLAND from 1947 to 1972.

David Sebel had emigrated from Russia circa 1912 and set up in partnership as a Wheelwright in East London in 1921. In 1928 he moved the Company to Lant Street in the Borough, London S.E.1 with the take over of a firm, Hazeldine & Norton, of Wheelwright’s & Motor Body and Van Builders. Interestingly the house next to the premises had been the residence of Charles Dickens when his parents were in the Marshalsea Debtor’s Prison.

In the 1930’s they expanded into Architectural metalwork and other engineering projects. Also producing street cleaning carts, milk churns and fronts for Cinemas. In 1931 Harry Sebel, David’s son, joined the firm starting from the bottom up. During the Second World War the Company turned over to war work and several local premises were used for their production of aircraft and tank components, bunks for air raid shelters, bailey bridge components and even a tower for an experimental radar station.

In the early 1940’s Harry was looking to the future and realised that they’re would be a need to expand the company and find work for the existing workforce and those which had been called up. After much research it was decided to go into metal furniture, under the Trade name Stak-a-Bye and into the toy business. But what to make which would be different from anyone else. Harry had the idea of a Rocking Horse which the rider could propel along themselves. Basic plans were drawn up and a full size horse mock up was made using bicycle gears. To get an idea of what the finished product would look like a Taxidermist in Piccadilly was approached for a horse hide, the only thing he had was from a Zebra so that was used. The prototype Zebra was still around at the Erith factory for several years. A Patent was taken out in 1942 for the basic mechanism. Later Charles Morewood, RA was commissioned to sculpt the clay body of what became the Mobo Bronco. The steel furniture business was set up in 1946 from the Weller Street side of the premises, a name which was used at the Erith factory to denote the furniture production building.

The Lant Street premises were not going to be big enough for the toy and furniture business envisaged and so the ex Vickers Gun Works at 177, West Street, Erith, Kent were purchased in February, 1947. As the intention was to produce everything in-house from the arrival of the raw material to the finished product, the full kitting out of the factory with large presses, dip tanks, spray booths, etc. took a while. Toy production did not start at Erith until September, 1947. However, some toys had been assembled at Lant Street, produced by outside contractor’s, to enable a display at the British Industries Fair in May,1947. The other toys on show were Merry Go Round,Rocker Swing, Chair Desk and Roll-a-Bye Skates.

The name ‘Mobo’ came from a brain-storming session when ‘Mobile Toys’ had been rejected. The clown on the decal was due to an interest in the Circus by the David Sebel. The Circus theme was used in a lot of their Exhibition Stands and advertising. A tin clown was designed but never went into production. It would have been an early Action Man!. Later advertising and instruction sheets used the Mobo title as two characters ‘Mr Mo’ and ‘Miss Bo’.

rbronco.jpg (41904 bytes) RED_SNAIL.jpg (50322 bytes) rpony.jpg (43788 bytes)

The most well known toy is the BRONCO, the ride-on horse. It works by the rider sitting on the horse and pushing down on the stirrups, then releasing them and then the horse moves along. From 1947 to 1950 the Bronco could only be steered in a straight line, but in February, 1950 Magic Steering was introduced. This enabled the rider by pushing on either stirrup to move the horse in that direction. The Broncho was so popular that it stayed in production until 1971.

The body pressings were also used for a series of other toys SPRING HORSE (PRAIRIE KING), NIGHT RIDER, PRAIRIE PRANCER, RANGE RIDER two different types produced, ROCKING HORSE, & BRONCHO MERRY GO ROUND.

The colours came from ‘market research’ with the local school children at West Street School – yellow and red being the favourite. These children were also used for photo shoots for advertising and testing the toys.

In 1949 the ‘Walking SNAIL’ was introduced at the New York Toy Fair, also at the same fair the ‘PONY’ was first shown. The ‘Pony’ pressings went on to be used on several different toys – PONY ROCKER, PIONEER WAGON, PONY EXPRESS, PONY KART, PONY BUGGY, SURREY TROTTER, TODDLE PONY. 1948 also saw the introduction of the first small remote control walking toy – the TOY-TOISE. This was a great success not just for children, but also adults, as they were used for Toy-toise races at many parties. The SPANIEL – at first sold as PUPPY – and SPANIEL followed with the same mechanism, also a CANOE.

The American Market was an amazing success for the MOBO Company. In 1948 they exported to the USA half of the total toy exports of ALL British Toy Companies. At this time Britain was recovering from the Second World War and steel was rationed according to the amount of goods exported. Mobo never had any trouble obtaining supplies because of their excellent export record. A New York office had been opened in 1948 at the Breslin Building, Broadway, New York and an American subsidiary formed Sebel Products Inc. Other major markets were Australia and South Africa.

A Showroom & Office had been opened at 39/41 New Oxford Street, London W.C.1 in September, 1945.

Other toys produced included Prams, Bicycles, Desks, Wheelbarrows, Rockers, Swings, Scooters and from 1956 Pedal Cars.

In 1951 Harry & David emigrated to Australia and set up a factory at Bankstown, Sydney. Here they produced both Toys and Furniture. The components were shipped from Erith and assembled and painted at Bankstown. The Australian company decided in 1957 to concentrate on the furniture business and so toy production was stopped. The furniture business still goes on today as part of the GWA International Group, and they have just opened a branch in the United Kingdom.

In 1955 the Toy Boat business of Harold Flory Ltd., of Bromley, Kent was taken over. They produced the SNIPE, SWIFT, ST. CHRISTOPHER Motor Boats, the SPRITE YACHT, and the SNORT SUBMARINE, also Toy Cars. The boats were continued in production by Mobo’s.

Jetex, the Model Aircraft Engine business was purchased in 1956. Besides a range of Jet propelled engines they also produced model kits for aircraft and a plastic boats and cars for the Jetex engine.

The mid 1960’s saw an introduction of toys made from injection moulded plastic and the importation of a range of plastic Pedal cars from Pines of Italy. These included a Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Pedal Car. A range of bicycles was also imported from Italy.

By the late 1960’s the British toy industry was having a difficult time due to cheap imports from the Far East. When John Bentley of Barclay Securities made an offer to purchase the Company in 1970 it was taken up. The Barclay Toy Group was formed to which Chad Valley, Charles Methuen and Tri-ang were added in 1971. Unfortunately the overheads of the Group meant that losses were still being made and a major reorganisation took place in 1972 with the Erith Works being closed and all production of all Mobo Toys ceasing. The site is now a large housing estate.

MOBO TOYS
mobo furniture
Image by EVERYMAN FILMS
MOBO TOYS’ were made by D. SEBEL & CO., ERITH, KENT, ENGLAND from 1947 to 1972.

David Sebel had emigrated from Russia circa 1912 and set up in partnership as a Wheelwright in East London in 1921. In 1928 he moved the Company to Lant Street in the Borough, London S.E.1 with the take over of a firm, Hazeldine & Norton, of Wheelwright’s & Motor Body and Van Builders. Interestingly the house next to the premises had been the residence of Charles Dickens when his parents were in the Marshalsea Debtor’s Prison.

In the 1930’s they expanded into Architectural metalwork and other engineering projects. Also producing street cleaning carts, milk churns and fronts for Cinemas. In 1931 Harry Sebel, David’s son, joined the firm starting from the bottom up. During the Second World War the Company turned over to war work and several local premises were used for their production of aircraft and tank components, bunks for air raid shelters, bailey bridge components and even a tower for an experimental radar station.

In the early 1940’s Harry was looking to the future and realised that they’re would be a need to expand the company and find work for the existing workforce and those which had been called up. After much research it was decided to go into metal furniture, under the Trade name Stak-a-Bye and into the toy business. But what to make which would be different from anyone else. Harry had the idea of a Rocking Horse which the rider could propel along themselves. Basic plans were drawn up and a full size horse mock up was made using bicycle gears. To get an idea of what the finished product would look like a Taxidermist in Piccadilly was approached for a horse hide, the only thing he had was from a Zebra so that was used. The prototype Zebra was still around at the Erith factory for several years. A Patent was taken out in 1942 for the basic mechanism. Later Charles Morewood, RA was commissioned to sculpt the clay body of what became the Mobo Bronco. The steel furniture business was set up in 1946 from the Weller Street side of the premises, a name which was used at the Erith factory to denote the furniture production building.

The Lant Street premises were not going to be big enough for the toy and furniture business envisaged and so the ex Vickers Gun Works at 177, West Street, Erith, Kent were purchased in February, 1947. As the intention was to produce everything in-house from the arrival of the raw material to the finished product, the full kitting out of the factory with large presses, dip tanks, spray booths, etc. took a while. Toy production did not start at Erith until September, 1947. However, some toys had been assembled at Lant Street, produced by outside contractor’s, to enable a display at the British Industries Fair in May,1947. The other toys on show were Merry Go Round,Rocker Swing, Chair Desk and Roll-a-Bye Skates.

The name ‘Mobo’ came from a brain-storming session when ‘Mobile Toys’ had been rejected. The clown on the decal was due to an interest in the Circus by the David Sebel. The Circus theme was used in a lot of their Exhibition Stands and advertising. A tin clown was designed but never went into production. It would have been an early Action Man!. Later advertising and instruction sheets used the Mobo title as two characters ‘Mr Mo’ and ‘Miss Bo’.

rbronco.jpg (41904 bytes) RED_SNAIL.jpg (50322 bytes) rpony.jpg (43788 bytes)

The most well known toy is the BRONCO, the ride-on horse. It works by the rider sitting on the horse and pushing down on the stirrups, then releasing them and then the horse moves along. From 1947 to 1950 the Bronco could only be steered in a straight line, but in February, 1950 Magic Steering was introduced. This enabled the rider by pushing on either stirrup to move the horse in that direction. The Broncho was so popular that it stayed in production until 1971.

The body pressings were also used for a series of other toys SPRING HORSE (PRAIRIE KING), NIGHT RIDER, PRAIRIE PRANCER, RANGE RIDER two different types produced, ROCKING HORSE, & BRONCHO MERRY GO ROUND.

The colours came from ‘market research’ with the local school children at West Street School – yellow and red being the favourite. These children were also used for photo shoots for advertising and testing the toys.

In 1949 the ‘Walking SNAIL’ was introduced at the New York Toy Fair, also at the same fair the ‘PONY’ was first shown. The ‘Pony’ pressings went on to be used on several different toys – PONY ROCKER, PIONEER WAGON, PONY EXPRESS, PONY KART, PONY BUGGY, SURREY TROTTER, TODDLE PONY. 1948 also saw the introduction of the first small remote control walking toy – the TOY-TOISE. This was a great success not just for children, but also adults, as they were used for Toy-toise races at many parties. The SPANIEL – at first sold as PUPPY – and SPANIEL followed with the same mechanism, also a CANOE.

The American Market was an amazing success for the MOBO Company. In 1948 they exported to the USA half of the total toy exports of ALL British Toy Companies. At this time Britain was recovering from the Second World War and steel was rationed according to the amount of goods exported. Mobo never had any trouble obtaining supplies because of their excellent export record. A New York office had been opened in 1948 at the Breslin Building, Broadway, New York and an American subsidiary formed Sebel Products Inc. Other major markets were Australia and South Africa.

A Showroom & Office had been opened at 39/41 New Oxford Street, London W.C.1 in September, 1945.

Other toys produced included Prams, Bicycles, Desks, Wheelbarrows, Rockers, Swings, Scooters and from 1956 Pedal Cars.

In 1951 Harry & David emigrated to Australia and set up a factory at Bankstown, Sydney. Here they produced both Toys and Furniture. The components were shipped from Erith and assembled and painted at Bankstown. The Australian company decided in 1957 to concentrate on the furniture business and so toy production was stopped. The furniture business still goes on today as part of the GWA International Group, and they have just opened a branch in the United Kingdom.

In 1955 the Toy Boat business of Harold Flory Ltd., of Bromley, Kent was taken over. They produced the SNIPE, SWIFT, ST. CHRISTOPHER Motor Boats, the SPRITE YACHT, and the SNORT SUBMARINE, also Toy Cars. The boats were continued in production by Mobo’s.

Jetex, the Model Aircraft Engine business was purchased in 1956. Besides a range of Jet propelled engines they also produced model kits for aircraft and a plastic boats and cars for the Jetex engine.

The mid 1960’s saw an introduction of toys made from injection moulded plastic and the importation of a range of plastic Pedal cars from Pines of Italy. These included a Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Pedal Car. A range of bicycles was also imported from Italy.

By the late 1960’s the British toy industry was having a difficult time due to cheap imports from the Far East. When John Bentley of Barclay Securities made an offer to purchase the Company in 1970 it was taken up. The Barclay Toy Group was formed to which Chad Valley, Charles Methuen and Tri-ang were added in 1971. Unfortunately the overheads of the Group meant that losses were still being made and a major reorganisation took place in 1972 with the Erith Works being closed and all production of all Mobo Toys ceasing. The site is now a large housing estate.

MOBO TOYS
mobo furniture
Image by EVERYMAN FILMS
MOBO TOYS’ were made by D. SEBEL & CO., ERITH, KENT, ENGLAND from 1947 to 1972.

David Sebel had emigrated from Russia circa 1912 and set up in partnership as a Wheelwright in East London in 1921. In 1928 he moved the Company to Lant Street in the Borough, London S.E.1 with the take over of a firm, Hazeldine & Norton, of Wheelwright’s & Motor Body and Van Builders. Interestingly the house next to the premises had been the residence of Charles Dickens when his parents were in the Marshalsea Debtor’s Prison.

In the 1930’s they expanded into Architectural metalwork and other engineering projects. Also producing street cleaning carts, milk churns and fronts for Cinemas. In 1931 Harry Sebel, David’s son, joined the firm starting from the bottom up. During the Second World War the Company turned over to war work and several local premises were used for their production of aircraft and tank components, bunks for air raid shelters, bailey bridge components and even a tower for an experimental radar station.

In the early 1940’s Harry was looking to the future and realised that they’re would be a need to expand the company and find work for the existing workforce and those which had been called up. After much research it was decided to go into metal furniture, under the Trade name Stak-a-Bye and into the toy business. But what to make which would be different from anyone else. Harry had the idea of a Rocking Horse which the rider could propel along themselves. Basic plans were drawn up and a full size horse mock up was made using bicycle gears. To get an idea of what the finished product would look like a Taxidermist in Piccadilly was approached for a horse hide, the only thing he had was from a Zebra so that was used. The prototype Zebra was still around at the Erith factory for several years. A Patent was taken out in 1942 for the basic mechanism. Later Charles Morewood, RA was commissioned to sculpt the clay body of what became the Mobo Bronco. The steel furniture business was set up in 1946 from the Weller Street side of the premises, a name which was used at the Erith factory to denote the furniture production building.

The Lant Street premises were not going to be big enough for the toy and furniture business envisaged and so the ex Vickers Gun Works at 177, West Street, Erith, Kent were purchased in February, 1947. As the intention was to produce everything in-house from the arrival of the raw material to the finished product, the full kitting out of the factory with large presses, dip tanks, spray booths, etc. took a while. Toy production did not start at Erith until September, 1947. However, some toys had been assembled at Lant Street, produced by outside contractor’s, to enable a display at the British Industries Fair in May,1947. The other toys on show were Merry Go Round,Rocker Swing, Chair Desk and Roll-a-Bye Skates.

The name ‘Mobo’ came from a brain-storming session when ‘Mobile Toys’ had been rejected. The clown on the decal was due to an interest in the Circus by the David Sebel. The Circus theme was used in a lot of their Exhibition Stands and advertising. A tin clown was designed but never went into production. It would have been an early Action Man!. Later advertising and instruction sheets used the Mobo title as two characters ‘Mr Mo’ and ‘Miss Bo’.

rbronco.jpg (41904 bytes) RED_SNAIL.jpg (50322 bytes) rpony.jpg (43788 bytes)

The most well known toy is the BRONCO, the ride-on horse. It works by the rider sitting on the horse and pushing down on the stirrups, then releasing them and then the horse moves along. From 1947 to 1950 the Bronco could only be steered in a straight line, but in February, 1950 Magic Steering was introduced. This enabled the rider by pushing on either stirrup to move the horse in that direction. The Broncho was so popular that it stayed in production until 1971.

The body pressings were also used for a series of other toys SPRING HORSE (PRAIRIE KING), NIGHT RIDER, PRAIRIE PRANCER, RANGE RIDER two different types produced, ROCKING HORSE, & BRONCHO MERRY GO ROUND.

The colours came from ‘market research’ with the local school children at West Street School – yellow and red being the favourite. These children were also used for photo shoots for advertising and testing the toys.

In 1949 the ‘Walking SNAIL’ was introduced at the New York Toy Fair, also at the same fair the ‘PONY’ was first shown. The ‘Pony’ pressings went on to be used on several different toys – PONY ROCKER, PIONEER WAGON, PONY EXPRESS, PONY KART, PONY BUGGY, SURREY TROTTER, TODDLE PONY. 1948 also saw the introduction of the first small remote control walking toy – the TOY-TOISE. This was a great success not just for children, but also adults, as they were used for Toy-toise races at many parties. The SPANIEL – at first sold as PUPPY – and SPANIEL followed with the same mechanism, also a CANOE.

The American Market was an amazing success for the MOBO Company. In 1948 they exported to the USA half of the total toy exports of ALL British Toy Companies. At this time Britain was recovering from the Second World War and steel was rationed according to the amount of goods exported. Mobo never had any trouble obtaining supplies because of their excellent export record. A New York office had been opened in 1948 at the Breslin Building, Broadway, New York and an American subsidiary formed Sebel Products Inc. Other major markets were Australia and South Africa.

A Showroom & Office had been opened at 39/41 New Oxford Street, London W.C.1 in September, 1945.

Other toys produced included Prams, Bicycles, Desks, Wheelbarrows, Rockers, Swings, Scooters and from 1956 Pedal Cars.

In 1951 Harry & David emigrated to Australia and set up a factory at Bankstown, Sydney. Here they produced both Toys and Furniture. The components were shipped from Erith and assembled and painted at Bankstown. The Australian company decided in 1957 to concentrate on the furniture business and so toy production was stopped. The furniture business still goes on today as part of the GWA International Group, and they have just opened a branch in the United Kingdom.

In 1955 the Toy Boat business of Harold Flory Ltd., of Bromley, Kent was taken over. They produced the SNIPE, SWIFT, ST. CHRISTOPHER Motor Boats, the SPRITE YACHT, and the SNORT SUBMARINE, also Toy Cars. The boats were continued in production by Mobo’s.

Jetex, the Model Aircraft Engine business was purchased in 1956. Besides a range of Jet propelled engines they also produced model kits for aircraft and a plastic boats and cars for the Jetex engine.

The mid 1960’s saw an introduction of toys made from injection moulded plastic and the importation of a range of plastic Pedal cars from Pines of Italy. These included a Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Pedal Car. A range of bicycles was also imported from Italy.

By the late 1960’s the British toy industry was having a difficult time due to cheap imports from the Far East. When John Bentley of Barclay Securities made an offer to purchase the Company in 1970 it was taken up. The Barclay Toy Group was formed to which Chad Valley, Charles Methuen and Tri-ang were added in 1971. Unfortunately the overheads of the Group meant that losses were still being made and a major reorganisation took place in 1972 with the Erith Works being closed and all production of all Mobo Toys ceasing. The site is now a large housing estate.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Meet your plastic molding requirements in the most professional way by the leader

Meet your plastic molding requirements in the most professional way by the leader

Plastic being an economical and versatile stuff is used in almost all parts of the world. Injection molding is a manufacturing process in which plastic is molded to parts of a device or any appliance by use of suitable machines. Be it keyboard, mouse, soda bottles or plastic components in a home appliance, these are made from injection molding process. Selecting a top notch plastic injection molding company is crucial to get premium quality injection molded products at a cost effective rate in a professional and convenient way.

Asia Billion Industry Co. Limited is a leading name among Plastic Injection Tooling Manufacturer China and caters to the needs of its clients worldwide. Based in Shenzhen City of China the company takes pride on its high quality products and services and offers maximum value for money to all its clients. The company has carved a niche in this tough competitive business world due to its unflinching commitment to provide impeccable quality products and services. Thus it fulfills plastic molding requirements of a wide variety of industries that includes Medical, Automotive, and Electric, Household appliances and others.

With a well stocked inventory of a large number of injection molded automotive parts, CNC machining parts the experts can easily fulfill your molding tools and molded component requirements in a customized and comprehensive way. The company strictly follows a quality assurance program that ensures that all its products are tested to the highest standards and they provide optimum satisfaction and guaranteed peace of mind to the clients.

So make it a point to consult an expert of this leading Plastic Injection Tooling Manufacturer China and discuss your plastic molding requirement or browse the online inventory by clicking on this link http://www.ab-industry.net/. With a dominant online presence, large inventory of molded products and user-friendly shipping policies, Asia Billion Industry Co. Limited will facilitate you to meet your plastic injection molding requirements in a prompt and professional way thereby saving your precious time and money. You can make a call on the no-0086-134 8063 8827 or email on sales@ab-industry.com.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Nice China Metal Turning Prototype Manufacturers photos

A few nice china metal turning prototype manufacturers images I found:

Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: B-29 Superfortress “Enola Gay” panorama
china metal turning prototype manufacturers
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Boeing B-29 Superfortress "Enola Gay":

Boeing’s B-29 Superfortress was the most sophisticated propeller-driven bomber of World War II and the first bomber to house its crew in pressurized compartments. Although designed to fight in the European theater, the B-29 found its niche on the other side of the globe. In the Pacific, B-29s delivered a variety of aerial weapons: conventional bombs, incendiary bombs, mines, and two nuclear weapons.

On August 6, 1945, this Martin-built B-29-45-MO dropped the first atomic weapon used in combat on Hiroshima, Japan. Three days later, Bockscar (on display at the U.S. Air Force Museum near Dayton, Ohio) dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan. Enola Gay flew as the advance weather reconnaissance aircraft that day. A third B-29, The Great Artiste, flew as an observation aircraft on both missions.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Boeing Aircraft Co.
Martin Co., Omaha, Nebr.

Date:
1945

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 900 x 3020cm, 32580kg, 4300cm (29ft 6 5/16in. x 99ft 1in., 71825.9lb., 141ft 15/16in.)

Materials:
Polished overall aluminum finish

Physical Description:
Four-engine heavy bomber with semi-monoqoque fuselage and high-aspect ratio wings. Polished aluminum finish overall, standard late-World War II Army Air Forces insignia on wings and aft fuselage and serial number on vertical fin; 509th Composite Group markings painted in black; "Enola Gay" in black, block letters on lower left nose.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

Nice Plastic Prototypes Factory photos

A few nice plastic prototypes factory images I found:

Alpine Renault
plastic prototypes factory
Image by pedrosimoes7
Motorclássico, FIL, Parque das Nações, Lisbon, Portugal

in Wikipedia

Alpine (French pronunciation: ​[alpin]) was a French manufacturer of racing and sports cars that used rear-mounted Renault engines.
Jean Rédélé (1922 – 2007), the founder of Alpine, was originally a Dieppe garage proprietor, who began to achieve considerable competition success in one of the few French cars produced just after World War 2. The company was bought in 1978 by Renault.

History

Early days
Using Renault 4CVs, Rédélé gained class wins in a number of major events, including the Mille Miglia and Coupe des Alpes. As his experience with the little 4CV built up, he incorporated many modifications, including for example, special 5-speed gear boxes replacing the original 3-speed unit. To provide a lighter car he built a number of special versions with lightweight aluminium bodies: he drove in these at Le Mans and Sebring with some success in the early 1950s.

Encouraged by the development of these cars and consequent customer demand, he founded the Société Anonyme des Automobiles Alpine in 1954. The firm was named Alpine after his Coupe des Alpes successes. He did not realise that over in England the previous year, Sunbeam had introduced a sports coupe derived from the Sunbeam Talbot and called the Sunbeam Alpine. This naming problem was to cause problems for Alpine throughout its history.

Coach Alpine A106 Mille Milles 1955 (First alpine).

In 1955, he worked with the Chappe brothers to be amongst the pioneers of auto glass fibre construction and produced a small coupe, based on 4CV mechanicals and called the Alpine A106. It used the platform chassis of the original Renault 4CV. The A106 achieved a number of successes through the 1950s and was joined by a low and stylish cabriolet. Styling for this car was contracted to the Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti. Under the glassfibre body was a very stiff chassis based on a central tubular backbone which was to be the hallmark of all Alpines built.

Alpine A110 Berlinette (1962-1967).

Alpine then took the Michelotti cabriolet design and developed a 2+2 closed coupe (or ‘berlinette’) body for it: this became the Alpine A108, now featuring the Dauphine Gordini 845 cc engine, which on later models was bored out to give a capacity of 904 cc or (subsequently) 998 cc.[1] The A108 was built between 1958 and 1963.

1960s

In 1962, the A108 begun to be produced also in Brazil, by Willys-Overland. It was the Willys Interlagos (berlineta, coupé and convertible).

Willys Interlagos Berlineta, the Brazilian A108
By now the car’s mechanicals were beginning to show their age in Europe. Alpine were already working closely with Renault and when the Renault R8 saloon was introduced in 1962. Alpine redeveloped their chassis and made a number of minor body changes to allow the use of R8 mechanicals.

This new car was the A110 Berlinette Tour de France, named after a successful run with the Alpine A108 in the 1962 event. Starting with a 956 cc engine of 51 bhp (38 kW), the same chassis and body developed with relatively minor changes over the years to the stage where, by 1974, the little car was handling 1800 cc engines developing 180 bhp (134 kW)+. With a competition weight for the car of around 620 kg (1,367 lb), the performance was excellent.

Alpine achieved increasing success in rallying, and by 1968 had been allocated the whole Renault competition budget. The close collaboration allowed Alpines to be sold and maintained in France by normal Renault dealerships. Real top level success started in 1968 with outright wins in the Coupe des Alpes and other international events. By this time the competition cars were fitted with 1440 cc engines derived from the Renault R8 Gordini. Competition successes became numerous, helped since Alpine were the first company fully to exploit the competition parts homologation rules.

1970s

In 1971, Alpine achieved a 1-2-3 finish in the Monte Carlo rally, using cars with engines derived from the Renault 16. In 1973, they repeated the 1-2-3 Monte Carlo result and went on to win the World Rally Championship outright, beating Porsche, Lancia and Ford. During all of this time, production of the Alpine A110 increased and manufacturing deals were struck for A110s and A108s with factories in a number of other countries including Spain, Mexico, Brazil and Bulgaria.
1973 brought the international petrol crisis, which had profound effects on many specialist car manufacturers worldwide. From a total Alpine production of 1421 in 1972, the numbers of cars sold dropped to 957 in 1974 and the company was bailed out via a takeover by Renault. Alpine’s problems had been compounded by the need for them to develop a replacement for the A110 and launch the car just when European petrol prices leapt through the roof.

Alpine A110 Berlinette Group 4 (1971-1974).

Through the 1970s, Alpine continued to campaign the A110, and later the Alpine A310 replacement car. However, to compete with Alpine’s success, other manufacturers developed increasingly special cars, notably the Lancia Stratos which was based closely on the A110’s size and rear-engined concept, though incorporating a Ferrari engine. Alpine’s own cars, still based on the 1962 design and using a surprising number of production parts, became increasingly uncompetitive. In 1974 Alpine built a series of factory racing Renault 17 Gordinis (one driven by Jean-Luc Thérier) that won the Press on Regardless World Rally Championship round in Michigan, USA.

In fact, having achieved the rally championship, and with Renault money now fully behind them, Alpine had set their sights on a new target. The next aim was to win at Le Mans. Renault had also taken over the Gordini tuning firm and merged the two to form Renault Sport. A number of increasingly successful sports racing cars appeared, culminating in the 1978 Le Mans win with the Renault Alpine A442B. This was fitted with a turbo-charged engine; Alpine had been the first company to run in and win an international rally with a turbo car as far back as 1972 when Jean-Luc Thérier took a specially modified A110 to victory on the Critérium des Cévennes.

1980s
Alpine Renault continued to develop their range of models all through the 1980s. The A310 was the next modern interpretation of the A110. The Alpine A310 was a sports car with a rear-mounted engine and was initially powered by a four-cylinder 1.6 L sourced Renault 17 TS/Gordini engine. In 1976 the A310 was restyled by Robert Opron and fitted with the more powerful and newly developed V6 PRV engine. The 2.6 L motor was modified by Alpine with a four-speed manual gearbox. Later they would use a Five-speed manual gearbox and with the group 4 model get a higher tune with more cubic capacity and 3 twin barrel Weber carburetors.

Alpine A310 V6 GT Pack (1983-1984).

After the A310 Alpine transformed into the new Alpine GTA range produced from plastic and polyester components, commencing with normally aspirated PRV V6 engines. In 1985 the V6 Turbo was introduced to complete the range. This car was faster and more powerful than the normally aspirated version. In 1986 polyester parts were cut for the first time by robot using a high pressure (3500 bar) water jet, 0.15 mm (0.01 in) in diameter at three times the speed of sound. In the same year the American specification V6 Turbo was developed.

In 1987 fitment of anti-pollution systems allowed the V6 Turbo to be distributed to Switzerland, Germany, Austria and the Netherlands. 1989 saw the launch of the limited edition GTA Mille Miles to celebrate Alpine’s 35th anniversary. Production was limited to 100 cars, all fitted with ABS braking, polished wheels, special leather interior and paintwork. This version was not available in RHD.

1990s

1990 saw the launch of the special edition wide bodied GTA Le Mans. The car wore polyester wheel arch extensions with a one piece front. Wheels were 3 piece BBS style produced by ACT, 8×16" front & 10×17" rear. Otherwise identical mechanically to the V6 Turbo, the engine was fitted with a catalytic converter and power was reduced to 185 bhp (138 kW). This model was available in the UK and RHD versions carried a numbered plaque on the dashboard. The Le Mans is the most collectable and valuable GTA derivative, since only 325 were made (299 LHD and 26 RHD). These were available from Renault dealers in the UK and the country’s motoring press are belatedly recognising the GTA series as the ‘great unsung supercar of the 1980s’

Alpine V6 Turbo Le Mans 1990

The Alpine A610 was launched in 1991. It was re-styled inside and out but was still recognisable as a GTA derivative. The chassis structure was extensively reworked but the central box principal remained the same. The front was completely re-designed the interior was also greatly improved. Air-conditioning and power steering were fitted as standard. The total production run for A610s derivatives was 818 vehicles 67 RHD and 751 LHD. After production of the A610 ended, the Alpine factory in Dieppe produced the Renault Sport Spider and a new era was to begin.
The last Alpine, an A610, rolled off the Dieppe line at 7. April 1995, Renault abandoning the Alpine name. This was always a problem in the UK market. Alpines could not be sold in the UK under their own name because Sunbeam owned the trade mark (because of the mid-50s Sunbeam Alpine Mk I). In the 1970s, for example Dieppe were building modified Renault R5s for the world wide market. The rest of the world knew them as R5 Alpines but in the UK they had to be renamed to R5 Gordini. Strangely enough with the numerous company takeovers that have occurred, it is another French company, PSA (Peugot/Talbot/Citroën) who now own the British Alpine trademark.

The Alpine factory in Dieppe continues to expand; in the 1980s they built the special R5 Turbo cars, following the rear engined formula they have always used. They built all Clio Williams and RenaultSport Spiders. The factory proudly put its Alpine badges on the built early batches of the mid engined Clio series one Clio V6. The Clio Series 2 was also assembled there with more recent RenaultSport Clio 172 and RenaultSport Clio 182s.
Between 1989 and 1995, a new Alpine named the A710 "Berlinette 2", was designed and 2 prototypes were built. Due to the cost of the project (600 millions Francs), and as adding modern equipment and interior would compromise the price and performances, the project was canceled.

Present

The Dieppe factory is known as the producer of RenaultSport models that are sold worldwide. This was originally the "Alpine" factory that Renault gained when they acquired the brand in 1973. Some of the Renault Sport models produced in Dieppe are currently the Mégane Renault Sport, Clio Renault Sport and the new Mégane Renault Sport dCi is to be built on Renault’s Dieppe assembly line. All the RenaultSport track-, tarmac- and gravel-racing Meganes and Clios are also made in the Dieppe factory.

In October 2007, it has been reported that Renault’s marketing boss Patrick Blain has revealed that there are plans for several sports cars in Renault’s future lineup, but stressed that the first model won’t arrive until after 2010. Blain confirmed that Renault is unlikely to pick a new name for its future sports car and will probably go with Alpine to brand it. Blain described it as being a “radical sports car” and not just a sports version of a regular model.

The new Alpine sports car will likely have a version of the Nissan GT-R’s Premium Midship platform.

The presence of sportier models in the Renault line-up would give the French automaker a better opportunity to capitalize on its Formula One prowess, having won two back-to-back world championships with Fernando Alonso, translating these efforts to its production cars is a moot point because Renault’s lineup is lacking in the sports car department. Management is hoping to change all that and is keen to start building sports cars again, as it has in the past, with the revival of the legendary Alpine label.

In France there is a large network of Alpine enthusiasts clubs. Clubs exist in many countries including the UK, USA, Australia, Japan.

In February 2009, Renault confirmed that plans to revive the Alpine brand have been frozen as a direct result of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis and recession.

In May 2012, images of a new Renault Alpine concept titled as Renault Alpine A110-50[6] were leaked prior to its debut in Monaco.

According to a Spanish car magazine it is said that the road version will be released in 2013.[citation needed]

In November 2012, Renault and Caterham announced plans to develop affordable race cars under the Alpine brand which are to be available in 2016.[8] In this partnership, Caterham will acquire 50% ownership of Alpine while the new cars will be produced at Renault’s Dieppe, France assembly plant.

(Post from China rapid prototyping manufacturer blog)