Ships on the River Wear, Sunderland

Check out these steel prototype company images:

Ships on the River Wear, Sunderland
steel prototype company
Image by Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
View of ‘Coogee’ and ‘Ruysdael’ built by J.L. Thompson & Sons alongside each other at Manor Quay, Sunderland, c1888 (TWAM ref. DS.JLT/4/PH/1/224/2/2).

This set celebrates the achievements of the famous Sunderland shipbuilding firm Joseph L. Thompson & Sons. The company’s origins date back to 1846 when the firm was known as Robert Thompson & Sons. Robert Thompson senior died in 1860, leaving his second son Joseph Lowes Thompson in control. In 1870 the shipyard completed its last wooden vessel and was then adapted for iron shipbuilding.

By 1880 the firm had expanded its operations over much of North Sands and in 1884 completed the construction of Manor Quay, which served as fitting out and repair facilities. For many years in the late nineteenth century the yard was the most productive in Sunderland and in 1894 had the fourth largest output of any shipyard in the world.

The Depression affected the firm severely in the early 1930s and no vessels were launched from 1931 to 1934. However, during those years the company developed a hull design giving greater efficiency and economy in service. During the Second World War the prototype developed by Joseph L. Thompson & Sons proved so popular that it was used by the US Government as the basis of over 2,700 Liberty ships built at American shipyards between 1942 and 1945.

After the War the North Sands shipyard went on to build many fine cargo ships, oil tankers and bulk carriers. Sadly the shipyard closed in 1979, although it briefly reopened in 1986 to construct the crane barge ITM Challenger.

(Copyright) We’re happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite ‘Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums’ when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you’re unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Sinsheim – Technikmuseum Sinsheim – DeLorean DMC-12 02
steel prototype company
Image by Daniel Mennerich
The DeLorean DMC-12 (commonly referred to simply as The DeLorean as it was the only model ever produced by the company) is a sports car manufactured by John DeLorean’s DeLorean Motor Company for the American market in 1981–82. Featuring gull-wing doors with a fiberglass "underbody", to which non-structural brushed stainless steel panels are affixed, the car became iconic for its appearance as a modified time machine in the Back to the Future film trilogy.

The first prototype appeared in October 1976, and production officially began in 1981 in Dunmurry, a suburb of south west Belfast, Northern Ireland (with the first DMC-12 rolling off the production line on January 21). During its production, several features of the car were changed, such as the hood style, wheels and interior. Approximately 9,000 DMC-12s were made before production halted in early 1983.

The DMC-12 was the only model produced by the company, which would go into liquidation as the US car market went through its largest slump since the 1930s. In 2007, about 6,500 DeLorean Motor cars were believed to still exist.

British entrepreneur Stephen Wynne based in Texas started a separate company in 1995 using the "DeLorean Motor Company" name and shortly thereafter acquired the trademark on the stylized "DMC" logo as well as the remaining parts inventory of the original DeLorean Motor Company. The company, at its suburban Humble, Texas location, completes newly assembled cars from new old stock (NOS) parts, original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and reproduction parts on a "made to order" basis using existing Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) plates.

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

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