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Image from page 790 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
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Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ home journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
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Text Appearing Before Image:
and fun to cook it! I thought, as I sniffed the Saturday baking,how many women could adapt some of theworking-wife-kitchen ideas. A handy mancould always build racks to hold kitchenutensils on the wall. Knife racks of variouskinds can be bought inexpensively. An eatingcounter could be made of old lumber, andwhy not use a pair of secondhand pianostools for chairs? The window sill in mostkitchens would stand widening, and thereyou have a place for telephone, radio, booksand files. The magazine rack and bulletinboard could be homemade in a short time. Breakfast equipment can always be finedup in one place, food supplies stored in groupsaccording to use. And the gift of color is any-ones, for paint and brushes are availableeven at a crossroad country store. Curtainsmay be made of inexpensive cotton or dressfabrics or dyed sheeting. A little planning,some help from the man of the house, andthe kitchen is ready for business and the busi-ness girl of today. the end WHY BE UP IN THE AIR ABOUT

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 791 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
china nylon sheet
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ home journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Smart sheet shoppers know value whenthey see it! Thats why so many womenchoose thomaston sheets! These softyet sturdy sheets are guaranteed towear long, wash well, keep their goodlooks for years. Thats why you save bychoosing thomaston quality ! Ask for thomaston sheets at your favoritestore—a quality for every purse and purpose. ~l$ a£a~A££ IS THE WASHWORD FOR CURTAINS ?ASHAWf & CPns tnvmt SH l/is3 WSlSTANr #™\* UG»r *ts,STANt p^feWJSSf* ! CU»T4.NS hang4M«G»fr THE ORIGINALLASTING FINISH FOR RAYON, NYLON& COTTON MARQUISETTE CURTAINS . es m°quiJe„es . W eo f°yo„ „ s,erfis/, wl. . i or. „ M,»;«s „;„. ,. Oee*pos**mo;sC n8wfcen<«-*eis din. D„„ d ^ **•■»»* ^c^ C C°rnS *• oi(ne„ a or e«ep„- , yed *„„ >**-,*-,. ■to* MOUNT HOPE FINISHING COMPANY NORTH DIGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS LADIES IIOMi: JOURNAL April

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Im th# little M thafc brings quid), safet/, more leisure and beauty to your home

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

That Was the Year That Was – 1974
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1974 is marked by the Three-Day Week, two General Elections, one change of national government, a state of emergency in Northern Ireland, extensive Provisional Irish Republican Army bombing of the British mainland, several large company collapses and major local government reorganisation.

1974 Inflation continues to spiral out of control around the world reaching 11.3% in the USA and 17.2% in the UK and the global recession deepens. The famous skeleton "Lucy" is discovered in Ethiopia which lived between 3.9 to 3 million years ago. More and more smaller digital based consumer products appear in the shops and the earliest forms of Word Processors appear which resemble a typewriter more than a computer. After the findings of the Watergate Scandal Richard Nixon becomes the first US president forced to resign from office.

Vietnam had begun to recede from the popular consciousness in America in the early ‘70s. It was a reviled war, an embarrassment. Servicemen returning from their term of duty would land in San Diego and disappear into the hinterland rather than go home, finding refuge in drugs, alcohol or wretched anonymity. There were few homecomings, in fact, not many yellow ribbons tied around the old oak tree, the symbol of thanksgiving for sacrifice. This was the war America no longer wanted, and the young men who died latterly for its discredited cause.

IRA bombing campaign on mainland Britain

IRA begins bombing campaign on mainland Britain and bombs The Tower of London on July 17th and the Houses of parliament and pubs in Birmingham.

M62 coach bombing: 12 people were killed when a bomb planted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army exploded on a coach on the M62 motorway in West Yorkshire. Eight of the dead were off-duty British Army soldiers, and two were children. 12 other people were seriously injured.

8 February – The M62 motorway bombing death toll reached 12 with the death in hospital of an 18-year-old soldier who had been seriously injured in the bombing.

4 November – Judith Ward was sentenced to life imprisonment for the M62 coach bombing.

17 June – A bomb exploded at the Houses of Parliament in London, damaging Westminster Hall. The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for planting the bomb.

17 July – A bomb planted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) exploded in the White Tower at the Tower of London, killing one person and injuring 41. Another bomb exploded outside a government building in South London.

5 October – The Guildford pub bombings at The Horse and Groom and The Seven Stars killed five people.

22 October – The Provisional IRA bombed Brooks’s club in London.

28 October – The wife and son of Sports Minister Denis Howell survived a provisional IRA bomb attack on their car.

A provisional IRA bomb exploded at the Kings Arms, Woolwich.

21 November – Birmingham pub bombings: In Birmingham, two pubs were bombed, killing 21 people and injuring many others.

24 November – The Birmingham Six were charged with the Birmingham pub bombings.

IRA Bomb, Bristol 1974

1974 Wednesday December 18th – Bristol was in Christmas mood and the gaily decorated shops in Park Street had been bustling with Christmas shoppers in the final run-up to the holiday. And then, at 7.30 p.m., came the call to Avon and Somerset police headquarters at Bridewell in the city centre. The telephone caller spoke with an Irish accent and said simply: ‘In 20 minutes to half-an-hour a bomb will go off in Park Street’. There were bomb hoaxes a-plenty that year as the mainland bombing campaign got into its stride.

Explosions in provincial cities as well as the capital made police take every warning call seriously. On the Avon and Somerset police patch, officers were even more rigorous after the region’s first taste of terrorism came with a warning following by the blast of a 51b bomb in The Corridor at Bath. That was just eight days before the Bristol phone call. The pattern was the same as at Bath. The caller with an Irish accent. The lack of a code word. The threat was real enough. Within 10 minutes of the alert 50 police officers were on Park Street, searching litter bins, dustbins, shop doorways and piles of wastepaper awaiting collection.

The search began at the bottom of Park Street and was making its way painstakingly up the hill when, at 7.54, there was the deafening roar and shockwaves of a device exploding outside Dixon’s photographic shop further up the road. One man was hurt and taken to hospital. The blast, the biggest bang suffered in the fashionable shopping street since bombs wrecked several shops during the blitzes of World War II, shattered plate glass shopfronts up and down the street.

Within a minute police had resumed their check of dustbins, doorways and other possible bomb hiding places. And then, at 8.03 and without a warning, a second bomb exploded in a dustbin out-side the Kenneth Harris hearing aid shop. The muffled crump of the detonation could be heard two miles away. In Park Street itself the bang was deafening. The second explosion seemed designed to catch police in the mop-up operation. In the event it caught a teenager hurrying to ring his and his girl-friend’s parents to tell them they had not been hurt in the first attack.

He suffered nasty burns and glass cuts. She was saved because he fell across her as shopfronts around them exploded in the shockwave. In just eight minutes Bristol’s premier shopping street had been reduced to a ghastly mockery of a Christmas attraction. Mercifully no one died, although 15 people were injured. The Post’s six-strong team sent to the scene described the aftermath of the terrorist attack: ‘A large facia above Kenneth Harris’s hangs at a crazy angle. The force of the explosion blasted downwards into a cellar buckling a steel beam. ‘The upward force has crumpled brickwork and a major re-building programme will be necessary.

‘Across the road more shops ring to the sound of hammers and crowbars as glass clinging to broken frames is cleared for safety. ‘A merry Christmas banner and silver tinsel, bathed still in an electric spotlight, looks incongruous flapping in the window of Rayner’s Records where the smiling faces of Bob Dylan and Sir John Barbirolli appear on record sleeves—beckoning to the Christmas trade. ‘At the Chapter and Verse bookshop, ironically, James Joyce’s volume Dubliners stands unscathed and draws the eye from Sir John Betjeman portrayed on his dustcover with a stoic grimace.

‘One wonders at the forces of science that in moments of explosion can cause such havoc yet leave seven milk bottles on a doorstep unscathed. ‘One marvels at the way vast panes of glass can just disappear and at the force that drives the splinters to destroy furniture in the gaping front of an antique store. ‘There is blood still on the pavement. It is a reminder above the clatter of the big clear-up that we are the lucky ones.

‘The idiocy of the Park Street bombers has taken its toll in many ways and the faces are grim of those with a devilish task of finding the clues that led to the culprits.’

The Rumble in the Jungle

On October 30, 1974, 32-year-old Muhammad Ali becomes the heavyweight champion of the world for the second time when he knocks out 25-year-old champ George Foreman in the eighth round of the “Rumble in the Jungle,” a match in Kinshasa, Zaire. Seven years before, Ali had lost his title when the government accused him of draft-dodging and the boxing commission took away his license. His victory in Zaire made him only the second dethroned champ in history to regain his belt.

The “Rumble in the Jungle” (named by promoter Don King, who’d initially tagged the bout “From the Slave Ship to the Championship!” until Zaire’s president caught wind of the idea and ordered all the posters burned) was Africa’s first heavyweight championship match. The government of the West African republic staged the event—its president, Mobutu Sese Seko, personally paid each of the fighters million simply for showing up—in hopes that it would draw the world’s attention to the country’s enormous beauty and vast reserves of natural resources. Ali agreed. “I wanted to establish a relationship between American blacks and Africans,” he wrote later. “The fight was about racial problems, Vietnam. All of that.” He added: “The Rumble in the Jungle was a fight that made the whole country more conscious.”

At 4:30 a.m. on October 30, 60,000 spectators gathered in the moonlight (organizers had timed the fight to overlap with prime time in the U.S.) at the outdoor Stade du 20 Mai to watch the fight. They were chanting “Ali, bomaye” (“Ali, kill him”). The ex-champ had been taunting Foreman for weeks, and the young boxer was eager to get going. When the bell rang, he began to pound Ali with his signature sledgehammer blows, but the older man simply backed himself up against the ropes and used his arms to block as many hits as he could. He was confident that he could wait Foreman out. (Ali’s trainer later called this strategy the “rope-a-dope,” because he was “a dope” for using it.)

By the fifth round, the youngster began to tire. His powerful punches became glances and taps. And in the eighth, like “a bee harassing a bear,” as one Times reporter wrote, Ali peeled himself off the ropes and unleashed a barrage of quick punches that seemed to bewilder the exhausted Foreman. A hard left and chopping right caused the champ’s weary legs to buckle, and he plopped down on the mat. The referee counted him out with just two seconds to go in the round.

Ali lost his title and regained it once more before retiring for good in 1981. Foreman, meanwhile, retired in 1977 but kept training, and in 1987 he became the oldest heavyweight champ in the history of boxing. Today, the affable Foreman is a minister and rancher in Texas and the father of five daughters and five sons, all named George. He’s also the spokesman for the incredibly popular line of George Foreman indoor grills.

News Headlines

India successfully detonates its first nuclear weapon on May 18th becoming the sixth nation to do so.

Conservative Prime Minister Edward Heath’s decision to call a snap election in February 1974 backfired. His plea to the electors to "return a strong government with a firm mandate" was ignored as Britain was faced with its first hung parliament since 1929.

Although Labour won fewer votes than the Conservatives, the party took four more seats, 301 against 297. After four days of indecision that saw Heath unable to convince the Liberals to lend him their support he had no choice but to resign.

Labour leader Harold Wilson was back in Downing Street for the third time, but now he would have to deal with the fresh challenge of heading a minority administration which could fall at any time.

Heath was prime minister for three years and 259 days but it felt like a decade at least, packed with one crisis after another. Ted Heath yearned for business as usual, but these were not usual times. In late 1973, he reacted to the miners’ work-to-rule by declaring his fifth and final state of emergency, imposing a three-day week from 1 January. Noddy Holder and Slade tried to keep spirits up with their chart-topping chorus – "Here it is, merry Christmas, everybody’s having fun!" – but did anyone believe them?

1974 saw some of the most miserable events in recent British history

The 70s in Britain have become "synonymous with the colour brown", which is certainly how I recall them: Vesta instant curries, Watneys Red Barrel, faux-velvet wallpaper, fawn-coloured nylon sheets. Yet this was offset by a gaudy display of flashiness and spivvery: Jason King’s moustache, Roger Moore’s lapels, Noddy Holder’s trousers, Slater Walker’s gleeful asset-strippers.

The years between 1974 and 1979 saw some of the most miserable events in recent British history – the three-day week, the Winter of Discontent, the decline of Britain’s industries, its empire and its standing in the world. Taxes rose, inflation soared and instances of violent crime doubled; while everything else – including the strength of the pound, standards of living, consumer confidence, producer confidence and confidence in general – plummeted.

This was the decade when the innocent twinkling of disco and Abba gave way to the harsh nihilism of punk; when Dixon of Dock Green was replaced by The Sweeney; and when the flowering of the permissive society produced the fruits of rising rates of divorce, drug use, abortion and teenage pregnancy.

There were a million things to be depressed about in the mid-Seventies: football hooliganism, IRA bombing, the Yorkshire Ripper, racial tension, nationalism and radicalism, working-class resentment, middle-class resentment, upper-class resentment, the destruction of direct-grant grammar schools and the Brain Drain.

“If I were a younger man,” Jim Callaghan admitted to his Cabinet colleagues in November 1974, “I would emigrate.” Thousands did exactly that – not only pop stars and actors like David Bowie, Rod Stewart and Roger Moore, but also managers, doctors and engineers. Over the following three years, for the first time in recorded history, the population of Britain fell because so many people were fleeing what they regarded as a sinking ship.

1st McDonalds opens in London

In October 1974, to no great fanfare and met pretty much with initial indifference by the British public, the first McDonald’s outlet in the UK opened in the London Borough of Woolwich, though the company decided to have its British HQ in rather more upmarket Hampstead .

The joys of the Big Mac, (“Do you want fries with that?”) the thick vanilla milkshake and the Egg McMuffin were of course soon to become almost omnipresent in the British High Street, but the concept of fast food (or the then British version of it, not completely slow food) was far from new, with Wimpey for years previously serving their burgers to Brits eager for a taste of pseudo-America.

The Woolwich McDonald’s was a significant one for the company: not only was it invading the British market, but it was a landmark too in that this was the 3,000th restaurant opened by the chain worldwide.

To break Britain the company needed the power of cleverly targeted TV ads, putting over the idea of food as fun and McDonald’s as a colourful and unstuffy place to eat. Love them or loathe them McDonald’s was destined to conquer the British market.

Lord Lucan disappears

Belgravia, London The 7th of November 1974 – Drinkers in the Plumbers Arms on Lower Belgrave St were astonished, on the evening of 7th November 1974 to have their peace shattered by a blood stained woman screaming for help. She cried "Help me, help me, help me. I’ve just escaped from being murdered. He’s in the house. He’s murdered the Nanny!".

This was Lady Lucan and so one of the most mysterious episodes of the 1970’s was to explode. The nanny, Sandra Rivett, had indeed been killed in the basement and there was no sign of the aristocratic serial gambler. He had fled to Sussex to the home of his friends Ian and Susan Maxwell-Scott in an agitated state and with blood stains on his clothing. Claiming he had interrupted a man assaulting his wife he pleaded his innocence and said that he had panicked.

The Maxwell-Scotts begged him to go to the police but he refused and set off in the early hours stating that "he had to get back". His abandoned Ford Corsair was found on the beach at Newhaven and there has been no sign (though numerous ‘sightings’) ever since

1974 Timeline

January – Britain enters its first postwar recession after statistics show that the economy contracted during the third and fourth quarters of last year.

1 January – New Year’s Day was celebrated as a public holiday for the first time.

The Northern Ireland Power-sharing Executive was set up in Belfast.

1 January–7 March – The Three-Day Week was introduced by the Conservative Government as a measure to conserve electricity during the period of industrial action by coal miners.

4 February – M62 coach bombing: 12 people were killed when a bomb planted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army exploded on a coach on the M62 motorway in West Yorkshire. Eight of the dead were off-duty British Army soldiers, and two were children. 12 other people were seriously injured.

7 February – The Prime Minister, Edward Heath, called a General Election for 28 February in an attempt to end the dispute over the miners’ strike. During the campaign, the Labour Party and Trades Union Congress agree a ‘Social Contract’ intended to produce wage restraint.

Grenada became independent of the United Kingdom.

8 February – The M62 motorway bombing death toll reached 12 with the death in hospital of an 18-year-old soldier who had been seriously injured in the bombing.

12 February – BBC1 first aired the children’s television series Bagpuss, made by Peter Firmin and Oliver Postgate’s Smallfilms in stop motion animation.

14 February – Bob Latchford, the Birmingham City centre forward, became Britain’s most expensive footballer in a £350,000 move to Everton.

Opinion polls show the Conservative government in the lead.

27 February – Enoch Powell, the controversial Conservative MP who was dismissed from the shadow cabinet in 1968 for his "Rivers of Blood" speech opposing mass immigration, announced his resignation from the party, in protest against Edward Heath’s decision to take Britain into the EEC.

28 February – The General Election resulted in the first hung parliament since 1929, with the Conservative government having 297 seats – four fewer than Labour, who have 301 – and the largest number of votes. Prime Minister Ted Heath hoped to form a coalition with the Liberal Party in order to remain in power.

4 March – Ted Heath failed to convince the Liberals to form a coalition and announced his resignation as Prime Minister, paving the way for Harold Wilson to become Prime Minister for the second time as Labour formed a minority government.

6 March – The miners’ strike came to an end due an improved pay offer by the new Labour government.

10 March – Ten miners died in a methane gas explosion at Golborne Colliery near Wigan, Lancashire.

11 March – Convicted armed robbers Kenneth Littlejohn and his brother Keith, who claimed to be British spies in the Republic of Ireland, escaped from Mountjoy Prison in Dublin.

15 March – Architect John Poulson was jailed for five years for corruption.

18 March – Oil embargo crisis: Most OPEC nations ended a 5 month oil embargo against the United States, Europe and Japan.

20 March – Ian Ball failed in his attempt to kidnap HRH Princess Anne and her husband Captain Mark Phillips in The Mall, outside Buckingham Palace.

29 March – The government re-established direct rule over Northern Ireland after declaring a state of emergency.

April – The Soviet car maker Lada, founded four years ago as a result of an enterprise by Italian automotive giant Fiat, began selling cars in the United Kingdom; its 1200 four-door saloon was based on the Fiat 124 and retailed for £999.

1 April – The Local Government Act 1972 came into effect in England and Wales, creating six new metropolitan counties and comprehensively redrawing the administrative map. Newport and Monmouthshire are legally transferred from England to Wales.

6 April – The 19th Eurovision Song Contest is staged at The Dome in Brighton. The winning Swedish group ABBA, go on to be the top-selling act of the decade.

24 April – Leeds United won their second Football League First Division title.

27 April – Manchester United were relegated from the Football League First Division where they have played continuously since 1938. Their relegation was confirmed when they lose 1-0 at home to their neighbours City in the penultimate game of the league season and the only goal of the game came from former United striker Denis Law.

1 May – Alf Ramsey, who guided England to World Cup glory in 1966, was dismissed by the Football Association after 11 years in charge.

2 May – The fascist far-right National Front gained more than 10% of the vote in several parts of London in council elections, but failed to net any councillors.

4 May – Liverpool won the FA Cup for the second time, beating Newcastle United 3-0 in the Wembley final, with Kevin Keegan scoring twice and Steve Heighway scoring the other goal.

6 May – Inauguration of full electric service on British Rail’s West Coast Main Line through to Glasgow.

7 May – Led Zeppelin announce their new record label, Swan Song Records, with a lavish party at The Four Seasons Hotel in New York.

17 May – The Loyalist paramilitary Ulster Volunteer Force carried out the Dublin and Monaghan bombings in the Republic of Ireland.

28 May – Power-sharing in the Northern Ireland Assembly collapsed following a strike by unionists.

1 June – Flixborough disaster: An explosion at a chemical plant in Flixborough, South Humberside, killed 28 people.

8 June – Jon Pertwee left Doctor Who in the final episode of Planet of the Spiders citing the death of his close acting friend Roger Delgado (who played ‘The Master’) the previous year as the reason. He was replaced by Tom Baker.

15 June – The Red Lion Square disorders saw members of the fascist National Front clash with counter-protesters in London’s West End; 21-year-old Kevin Gateley, a university student, is killed.

17 June – A bomb exploded at the Houses of Parliament in London, damaging Westminster Hall. The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility for planting the bomb.

24 June – The government admitted testing a nuclear weapon in the United States causing a rift in the Labour Party.

3 July – Don Revie, the manager of Football League champions Leeds United since 1961, accepted the Football Association’s £200,000-a-year deal to become the new England manager.

12 July – Bill Shankly, manager of FA Cup holders Liverpool, stunned the club by announcing his retirement after 15 years as manager. Shankly, 60, had arrived at Liverpool when they were in the Football League Second Division and transformed them into one of the world’s top club sides with three top division titles, two FA Cups and a UEFA Cup triumph.

17 July – A bomb planted by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) exploded in the White Tower at the Tower of London, killing one person and injuring 41. Another bomb exploded outside a government building in South London.

20 July – Leeds United appointed the Brighton & Hove Albion manager Brian Clough, formerly of Derby County as their new manager.

20 July – The first Knebworth Concert is held, headlined by The Allman Brothers Band.

21 July – 10,000 Greek-Cypriots protested in London against the Turkish invasion of Cyprus.

26 July – Liverpool appointed 55-year-old first team coach Bob Paisley as their new manager.

15 August – Collapse of Court Line and its subsidiaries Clarksons and Horizon Holidays leaves 100,000 holidaymakers stranded abroad.

29 August – Thames Valley Police broke up the Windsor Free Festival.

12 September – Brian Clough was dismissed after less than two months as manager of Leeds United following a disappointing start to the Football League season.

23 September – Ceefax was started by the BBC – one of the first public service information systems.

30 September – With the year’s second General Election 10 days away, opinion polls showed Labour in the lead with Harold Wilson well placed to gain the overall majority that no party had achieved in the election held seven months earlier.

October – Five previously all-male Colleges of the University of Oxford admitted women undergraduates for the first time.

1 October – The Fast food chain McDonald’s opened its first restaurant in Woolwich, London.

5 October – The Guildford pub bombings at The Horse and Groom and The Seven Stars killed five people.

10 October – The second general election of the year resulted in a narrow victory for Harold Wilson, giving Labour a majority of three seats. It was widely expected that Edward Heath’s leadership of the Conservative Party would soon be ended, as he had now lost three of the four general elections that he had contested in almost a decade as leader. The Scottish National Party secured its highest-ever Westminster party representation with 11 seats. Enoch Powell was elected to parliament in Northern Ireland for the Ulster Unionist Party. Powell, who was dismissed from the Tory shadow cabinet in April 1968 following his controversial Rivers of Blood speech on immigration, had left the Conservative Party at 28 February election and had recently rejected an offer to stand as a candidate for the National Front.

16 October – Rioting prisoners set fire to the Maze Prison in Belfast.

22 October – The Provisional IRA bombed Brooks’s club in London.

28 October – The wife and son of Sports Minister Denis Howell survived a provisional IRA bomb attack on their car.

2 November – George Harrison launches his "George Harrison & Friends North American Tour" in Vancouver. It’s Harrison’s first tour since the Beatles North American Tour of 1966.

4 November – Judith Ward was sentenced to life imprisonment for the M62 coach bombing.

7 November – Lord Lucan disappeared after the murder of his children’s nanny.

A provisional IRA bomb exploded at the Kings Arms, Woolwich.

11 November – The New Covent Garden Market in Nine Elms was opened.

21 November – Birmingham pub bombings: In Birmingham, two pubs were bombed, killing 21 people and injuring many others.

24 November – The Birmingham Six were charged with the Birmingham pub bombings.

25 November – Home Secretary Roy Jenkins announced the government’s intention to outlaw the IRA in the UK.

27 November – The Prevention of Terrorism Act was passed.

28 November – John Lennon joins Elton John on stage at Madison Square Garden for three songs. It would be Lennon’s last stage performance.

5 December – Party Political Broadcast, the final episode of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, was broadcast on BBC 2.

10 December – Friedrich Hayek shared the 1974 Nobel Prize in Economics with ideological rival Gunnar Myrdal "for their pioneering work in the theory of money and economic fluctuations and for their penetrating analysis of the interdependence of economic, social and institutional phenomena.".

Martin Ryle and Antony Hewish won the Nobel Prize in Physics "for their pioneering research in radio astrophysics: Ryle for his observations and inventions, in particular of the aperture synthesis technique, and Hewish for his decisive role in the discovery of pulsars".

12 December – Mick Taylor leaves The Rolling Stones after 6 years.

15 December – New speed limits were introduced on Britain’s roads in an attempt to save fuel at a time of Arab fuel embargoes following the Yom Kippur War.

18 December – The government paid £42,000 to families of victims of Bloody Sunday riots in Northern Ireland.

22 December – The London home of Conservative Party leader and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Edward Heath was bombed in a suspected provisional IRA attack. Mr Heath had been away from home when the bomb exploded, but returned just 10 minutes afterwards.

24 December – Former government minister John Stonehouse was found living in Australia having faked his own death. He was quickly arrested by Australian police, who initially believed that he was Lord Lucan.

Inflation soars to a 34-year high of 17.2%.

Last production in the UK of steel by the Bessemer process, at Workington.

China gives two Giant Pandas, Ching-Ching and Chia-Chia, to Britain.

Television

1974 TV adverts
www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyMWplSfO34

5 January – Tiswas starts as a local programme in the Midlands (on ATV), but the television show wasn’t fully automatically networked through ITV until 1979.

6 April – The 19th Eurovision Song Contest is held at the Dome in Brighton, produced and transmitted by the BBC. Katie Boyle hosts the event for the fourth time. Sweden wins the contest with the song "Waterloo", performed by ABBA, who become the first group to win the Contest. They go on to achieve huge international success.

8 June – Jon Pertwee makes his final regular appearance as the Third Doctor in the concluding moments of Part Six of the Doctor Who serial Planet of the Spiders. Tom Baker briefly appears as the Fourth Doctor at the conclusion of this serial.

5 August – For the first time on a pre-school children’s programme, the show Inigo Pipkin covers the death of the main character, Inigo, as the actor who played him (George Woodbridge) had died. The show is renamed Pipkins.

23 September – The BBC teletext service Ceefax goes live with 30 pages of information.

5 December – Party Political Broadcast, the final episode of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, is broadcast on BBC 2.

28 December – Tom Baker makes his first full appearance as the Fourth Doctor in the Doctor Who serial Robot.

ITV begins developing the ORACLE teletext service. Dates for its launch are unclear, but it became popular around 1980.

BBC 1

3 January – It Ain’t Half Hot Mum (1974–1981)
11 February – Bagpuss (1974)
9 May – Happy Ever After (1974–1978)
5 September – Porridge (1974–1977)
21 October – Roobarb (1974 BBC, 2005–2013 Channel 5)

ITV

4 January – Within These Walls (1974–1978)
5 January – Tiswas (1974–1982)
7 January – Wish You Were Here (1974–2003, 2008)
3 March – Not On Your Nellie (1974–1975)
5 March- Napoleon and Love (1974)
13 April – The Wheeltappers and Shunters Social Club (1974–1977)
3 May – My Old Man (1974–1975)
27 July – Don’t Drink the Water (1974–1975)
2 September – Rising Damp (1974–1978)
20 December – Churchill’s People (1974–1975)

Number Ones Singles

"Merry Xmas Everybody" – Slade
"You Won’t Find Another Fool Like Me"- The New Seekers
"Tiger Feet" – Mud4
"Devil Gate Drive" – Suzi Quatro
"Jealous Mind" – Alvin Stardust
"Billy Don’t Be a Hero" – Paper Lace
"Seasons in the Sun" – Terry Jacks
"Waterloo" – ABBA
"Sugar Baby Love" – The Rubettes
"The Streak" – Ray Stevens
"Always Yours" – Gary Glitter
"She" – Charles Aznavour
"Rock Your Baby" – George McCrae
"When Will I See You Again" – The Three Degrees
"Love Me for a Reason" – The Osmonds
"Kung Fu Fighting" – Carl Douglas
"Annie’s Song" – John Denver
"Sad Sweet Dreamer" – Sweet Sensation
"Everything I Own" – Ken Boothe
"Gonna Make You a Star" – David Essex
"You’re the First, the Last, My Everything" – Barry White
"Lonely This Christmas" – Mud

Albums

Tales from Topographic Oceans – Yes
Sladest – Slade
And I Love You So – Perry Como
The Singles: 1969-1973 – The Carpenters
Old, New, Borrowed and Blue – Slade
Journey to the Centre of the Earth – Rick Wakeman
The Singles: 1969-1973 – The Carpenters
Diamond Dogs: – David Bowie
Caribou: – Elton John
Band on the Run: – Paul McCartney & Wings
Hergest Ridge: – Mike Oldfield
Tubular Bells: – Mike Oldfield
Rollin’ – Bay City Rollers
Smiler – Rod Stewart
Greatest Hits: – Elton John

(Post from rapid prototyping companies in china blog)

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